Jim White (drummer)

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Jim White
A 45-year-old man is shown at his drum kit. Both drum sticks are blurred in motion. Part of the drum kit is out of view. The man is dressed in a dark jacket with a light shirt, his eyes are focussed down. Behind him is a mostly dark background, past his left shoulder is a blue and white picture.
White as a member of Tren Brothers, performing at Mercury Lounge, New York City, January 2008.
Background information
Birth name Jim Ronald White
Born 1962 (age 51–52)
Origin Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Genres Instrumental rock, noise rock
Occupation(s) Drummer, songwriter, producer
Instruments Drums, percussion
Years active 1980–present
Labels Bella Union, Anchor & Hope, Fat Cat
Associated acts Dirty Three, Anderson Henderson White, Xylouris White[1]
Website anchorandhope.com

Jim Ronald White (born 1962) is an Australian drummer, songwriter, and producer. In 1992 he formed Dirty Three, an instrumental rock band, with fellow mainstays Warren Ellis on violin and bass guitar; and Mick Turner on electric and bass guitars. In Dirty Three, White shares songwriting duties with Ellis and Turner. White has also played with various other artists including The Blackeyed Susans, Kim Salmon's STM (both with Ellis); The Tren Brothers (with Turner); and United States singer-songwriter, Nina Nastasia. On 28 May 2007 Nastasia and White issued an album, You Follow Me, which was co-produced by White, Nastasia and Kennan Gudjonsson.

Biography[edit]

Jim Ronald White was born in 1962 and grew up in Clifton Hill, Victoria.[2][3] In 1980, as a drummer, he formed Happy Orphans with Conway Savage on piano and backing vocals.[4] Late the following year he replaced Peter Rippon on drums in a noise rock group, The People with Chairs up Their Noses, alongside Mark Barry on bass guitar, David Palliser on saxophone and lead vocals, and Jim Shugg on lead guitar.[4][5][6] In 1982 they issued a split extended play on Au Go Go Records with their two tracks, "Road to Egg" and "The New Band", backed by a track from fellow Melbourne rockers Plays with Marionettes.[6][7] When performing White provided percussion by using an "ironing board covered with letter boxes and other domestic detritus".[8]

Also in 1982 White, with Shugg on lead guitar and lead vocals, rejoined Savage in a country rock group, Feral Dinosaurs.[4][5][9] He sometimes played in both The People with Chairs up Their Noses and Feral Dinosours on the same night.[5] Other founding members of Feral Dinosaurs were Nick Danyi on saxophone and David Last on double bass and vocals.[9] By late 1983 The People with Chairs up Their Noses had disbanded and White continued with Feral Dinosaurs.[4] In 1984 they provided a cover version of Don Gibson's 1958 hit, "Blue Day", on the various artist's compilation album, Asleep at the Wheel, for Au Go Go Records.[9] Feral Dinosaurs released two singles, "Ramblin' Man" and "50 Miles from Home", followed by an EP in December 1985, You've All Got a Home to Go To, on the Major Records label before disbanding in 1986.[9]

In 1985 White formed another band, Venom P. Stinger, as an avant-rock ensemble with Dugald MacKenzie on lead vocals (ex-Sick Things, Brainshack); Alan Secher-Jensen on bass guitar (Brainshack, Beachnuts); and Mick Turner on guitar (Sick Things, Fungus Brains, The Moodists).[4][10] They issued their debut album, Meet My Friend Venom (1986), but disbanded in 1989 when Turner returned to Fungus Brains. White had drummed for Hessian Sax during 1988 to 1989 and for Conway Savage & the Deep South in 1989. Venom P. Stinger's second album, What's Yours Is Mine, was released in October 1990.[4][10] The group reformed in 1991 with MacKenzie, Turner and White joined by Nick Palmer on lead vocals.[4][10] In November they issued a four-track EP, Waiting Room.[10] The group toured the United States and released a live album, Live (in Davis), in 1992.[4][10] By the end of the year White and Turner had left Venom P. Stinger.[4][10]

In 1992 White and Turner formed an instrumental rock group, Dirty Three, with Warren Ellis on violin (ex-These Future Kings).[4][11] The trio recorded a cassette, Dirty Three, as a give-away at early gigs.[12] In the same year White and Ellis were also working in the rock bands, The Blackeyed Susans,[13] Kim Salmon's STM and Charles Marshall and the Body Electric.[4][11] The following year White and Turner reformed Venom P. Stinger, and recorded another album, Tear Bucket, which appeared in 1996.[4][10] In 1994 White and Ellis backed Tex, Don and Charlie on a national tour.[11][13] In June that year Dirty Three issued their self-titled album on Torn & Frayed Records for which Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, praised White's "sympathetic drumming".[11]

In November 1994 they released an album in the US, Sad & Dangerous, which included tracks from their 1992 give-away cassette.[11] From March 1995 the trio toured the US and completed 200 gigs by year's end.[11] In July Sad & Dangerous was issued in Australia.[11] The group followed with further studio albums: Horse Stories (September 1996), Ocean Songs (March 1998), Whatever You Love, You Are (March 2000), She Has No Strings Apollo (February 2003), Cinder (October 2005) and Toward the Low Sun (February 2012).[11][12] Almost all of Dirty Three's material is co-written by White with Ellis and Turner.[14]

In mid-1998 White and Turner formed an instrumental duo, The Tren Brothers, and issued a five-track self-titled EP.[15] Most of The Tren Brothers material is written by Turner alone or with White.[16] In January 2000 White and Ellis backed Nick Cave on his tour of Australia.[11] In 2003 White backed Nina Nastasia and subsequently was recorded on her albums Run to Ruin (2003) and On Leaving (2006).[13] On 28 May 2007 the pair released a collaborative album, You Follow Me.[17] It was co-produced by White, Nastasia and Kennan Gudjonsson.[18] Allmusic's Thom Jurek noted that White "is not an accompanist here, he is a collaborator, even though he didn't write the songs", with the production emphasising his "full of bassy tom toms and wispy brushwork" where White "floats, digs, sputters, halts, and pushes through the music, just as [Nastasia's] playing guitar and singing does".[17] When not performing or recording White lives in New York.[19] In 2013 he started playing with Anderson Henderson White.[20]

Collaborations[edit]

Jim White has also played with a number of other artists, including:[13][21][22]

An October 2007 article in Time Out New York called him "indie rock's drummer of choice", saying, "Those who play with White speak of him with the ardor of religious converts."[23]

References[edit]

General
Specific
  1. ^ Huffington Post - The Low Anthem Revives a Theater and a Local Music Community in Providence
  2. ^ Calkin, Jessamy (5 December 1998). "Flying on Instruments". The Daily Telegraph (London: Telegraph Media Group). Retrieved 11 July 2013. "Nowadays they all live in different cities: ... and White, 36, in San Francisco" .
  3. ^ "Dirty Three – Chronology". From the Archives. 31 August 2011. Retrieved 11 July 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Jim White and related entries at Australian Rock Database:
    • Jim White: Holmgren, Magnus. "Jim White". Passage.se. Australian Rock Database. Passagen (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
    • Venom P. Stinger (1985–89,1991–92,1993–96): Holmgren, Magnus. "Venom P. Stinger". Passage.se. Australian Rock Database. Passagen (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 11 January 2004. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
    • Conway Savage and The Deep South (1989): Holmgren, Magnus. "Conway Savage". Passage.se. Australian Rock Database. Passagen (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 10 October 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
    • The Blackeyed Susans (1992–93): Holmgren, Magnus; Skjefte, Morten. "The Blackeyed Susans". Passage.se. Australian Rock Database. Passagen (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 10 September 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
    • Kim Salmon's STM (1992, 1994): Holmgren, Magnus; Miles, Richard. "Kim Salmon". Passage.se. Australian Rock Database. Passagen (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 27 May 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
    • Dirty Three (1992–present): Holmgren, Magnus. "Dirty Three". Passage.se. Australian Rock Database. Passagen (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
    • Charles Marshall and The Body Electric (1993–95): Holmgren, Magnus. "Charles Marshall". Passage.se. Australian Rock Database. Passagen (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 22 October 2013. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c "This Could Sound Like Nothing You've Heard". The Canberra Times (Fairfax Media). Australian Associated Press (AAP). 23 February 1983. p. 26. 
  6. ^ a b Plays with Marionettes / People with Chairs up Their Noses (Media notes). Plays with Marionettes / People with Chairs up Their Noses. Au Go Go Records. 1982. ANDA 21. 
  7. ^ McFarlane, 'The Wreckery' entry. Archived from the original on 3 August 2004. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  8. ^ Lee, Stewart (29 September 1996). "Dirty but Equal". The Sunday Times (News Corp. Stewart Lee Official Website). 
  9. ^ a b c d McFarlane, 'Feral Dinosaurs' entry. Archived from the original on 28 August 2004. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g McFarlane, 'Venom P. Stinger' entry. Archived from the original on 23 August 2004. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i McFarlane, 'Dirty Three' entry. Archived from the original on 7 August 2004. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  12. ^ a b "Dirty Three – Discography". From the Archives. 31 August 2011. Retrieved 11 July 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Jim White : Credits". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "'Alice Wading' at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 12 July 2013.  Note: User may have to click on tab 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' or 'Performer:'. When 'Performer:' is selected enter artist: Dirty Three – to obtain a listing of 124 tracks with 113 co-written by White.
  15. ^ Tren Brothers (1998), Tren Brothers, Drag City. National Library of Australia, retrieved 11 July 2013 
  16. ^ "'Kits Choice' at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 12 July 2013.  Note: User may have to click on tab 'Search again' and then 'Enter a title:' or 'Performer:'. When 'Performer:' is selected enter artist: Tren Brothers – to obtain a listing of 15 tracks with 6 co-written by White and 6 by Turner alone.
  17. ^ a b Jurek, Thom. "You Follow Me – Nina Nastasia, Jim White : Review". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  18. ^ "You Follow Me – Nina Nastasia, Jim White : Credits". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  19. ^ Teague, Marcus (20 February 2012). "Feature Album: Dirty Three Toward the Low Sun". TheVine. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 11 July 2013. 
  20. ^ http://lucidculture.wordpress.com/2013/06/30/ahw/
  21. ^ http://www.fromthearchives.com/dt/chronology.html
  22. ^ Ratliff, Ben (6 January 2007). "A Little Folk, a Little Rock and a Lot of Minimalism". The New York Times. 
  23. ^ Drumhead of the class, Jay Ruttenberg, Time Out New York, October 3, 2007