Jimmy Wood

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For other people named James Wood, see James Wood (disambiguation).
Jimmy Wood
Jimmy wood 1871.jpg
Second Baseman/Manager
Born: (1842-12-01)December 1, 1842
Brooklyn, New York
Died: November 30, 1927(1927-11-30) (aged 84)
San Francisco, California
Batted: Unknown Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 8, 1871 for the Chicago White Stockings
Last MLB appearance
November 1, 1873 for the Philadelphia White Stockings
Career statistics
Batting average .333
Runs scored 162
Runs batted in 83
Teams
  National Association of Base Ball Players
Brooklyn Eckfords (1860–1869)
Chicago White Stockings (1870)
  League player
Chicago White Stockings (1871)
Troy Haymakers (1872)
Brooklyn Eckfords (1872)
Philadelphia White Stockings (1873)
  League manager
Chicago White Stockings (1871), (18741875)
Troy Haymakers (1872)
Brooklyn Eckfords (1872)
Philadelphia White Stockings (1873)
Career highlights and awards

James Leon "Jimmy" Wood (December 1, 1842 – November 30, 1927) was an American second baseman and manager in Major League Baseball who hailed from Brooklyn, New York. He was the player-manager for four different teams in the National Association, where he spent his entire career.[1]

Wood's career in organized baseball began as early as 1860 when he began play for the Eckford of Brooklyn team, with whom he played for nine seasons during the following decade. In 1870, he took the position of player-manager for the Chicago White Stockings.[2] It was here that he is credited for inventing spring training when he moved his team down to New Orleans, Louisiana prior to season to train in warmer weather.[3] For the 1871 season, the team became a charter member of the National Association, but folded the following season, and Wood moved on to manage two other ill-fated teams; the Troy Haymakers and his old Eckford team. The next season, 1873, he managed the Philadelphia White Stockings for a year until he was able to reorganize a new Chicago team.[1][2]

In 1874, he tried to lance an abscess on his leg with a pocketknife. This caused an infection which led to an eventual amputation of the leg. This did not end his managerial career, though; he returned to the Chicago White Stockings, and managed them for two seasons before the National Association folded in 1875. He then retired from professional baseball and moved to Florida and began investing in citrus interests. His daughter, Carrie, married William Chase Temple, who was at one time, the owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was he who the Temple Cup was named after. Wood's granddaughter, Dorothy Temple, married pitcher Del Mason. Wood's whereabouts had been debated for years until recently.[4] In 1885, he operated a sporting goods store in Chicago.[2] He was traced all over the United States and Canada and eventually wound up in San Francisco, California,[4] where he died and is interred at Greenwood Cemetery in New Orleans.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Jimmy Wood's career stats". retrosheet.org. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  2. ^ a b c "Long Before the Dodgers: Baseball in Brooklyn, 1855–1884, pgs. 152–153". James L. Terry. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  3. ^ "Baseball Anecdotes, pg. 11". by Daniel Okrent, Steve Wulf. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 
  4. ^ a b "Jimmy Wood Found". sabr.org/Author: Bill Carle. Retrieved 2008-01-27. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
First manager
Chicago White Stocking Managers
1871
Succeeded by
No Team
Preceded by
Bill Craver
Troy Haymakers Managers
1872
Succeeded by
Team Folded
Preceded by
Jim Clinton
Brooklyn Eckfords Managers
1872
Succeeded by
Team Folded
Preceded by
Fergy Malone
Philadelphia White Stocking Managers
1873
Succeeded by
Bill Craver
Preceded by
Fergy Malone
Chicago White Stocking Managers
1874-1875
Succeeded by
League Folded