Jimson Weed (painting)

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Jimson Weed
Jimson Weed by Georgia O'Keeffe.jpg
Artist Georgia O'Keeffe
Year 1936
Type Oil on linen
Dimensions 180 cm × 212 cm (70 in × 83.5 in)
Location Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis

Jimson Weed is an oil on linen painting by American artist Georgia O'Keeffe from 1936, located in the Indianapolis Museum of Art, which is in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. It depicts four large blossoms of jimson weed, or datura.

Description[edit]

O'Keeffe reiterated the pinwheel-shaped flowers' structure in the tight placement of the four blossoms in the painting. Her use of rhythmic light and shade and a simplified palette underscores their fresh, simple beauty.[1]

Historical information[edit]

O'Keeffe was immensely fond of jimson weed, ignoring its seeds' toxicity and allowing it to flourish around her patio.[2] She paid tribute to the bloom in this painting, originally entitled Miracle Flower. Jimson Weed was commissioned by cosmetics magnate Elizabeth Arden for the new Gymnasium Moderne of her Fifth Avenue Salon in New York City. Placed in the exercise room, the unfurling blossoms were meant to encourage clients in their stretches. Arden paid the exorbitant sum of $10,000 for the largest floral composition O'Keeffe would ever create.[3]

Acquisition[edit]

The painting was acquired by the IMA in 1997, a gift of Eli Lilly and Company, who had acquired it from Arden's salon in 1971. It is currently on view in the Paine American Modernism Gallery and has the accession number 1997.131.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goodman, Melissa. "Datura flowers in art and images". The Gifted Photographer. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter (2004). Full Bloom: The Art and Life of Georgia O'Keeffe. W. W. Norton & Company. p. 376. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Lee, Ellen Wardwell; Robinson, Anne (2005). Indianapolis Museum of Art: Highlights of the Collection. Indianapolis: Indianapolis Museum of Art. ISBN 0936260777. 
  4. ^ "Jimson Weed". Indianapolis Museum of Art. Retrieved 14 November 2012.