Jinmaku Kyūgorō

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Jinmaku Kyūgorō
陣幕 久五郎
Jinmaku Kyugoro.JPG
Personal information
Born Shintaro Ishigura
(1829-06-04)June 4, 1829
Shimane, Japan
Died October 21, 1903(1903-10-21) (aged 74)
Height 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 138 kg (304 lb)
Career
Stable Hidenoyama
Record 87-5-65-17draws-3holds
(Makuuchi)
Debut November, 1850
Highest rank Yokozuna (July, 1867)
Retired November, 1867
Championships 5 (Makuuchi, unofficial)
* Up to date as of June 2013.

Jinmaku Kyūgorō (陣幕 久五郎, June 4, 1829 – October 21, 1903) was a sumo wrestler from what is now Shimane, Japan. He was the sport's 12th yokozuna.

Career[edit]

Woodblock print of Jinmaku

Jinmaku was born in Ou District, Izumo Province (modern Yatsuka District, Shimane). His real name may have been Shintaro Ishigura (石倉 槇太郎, Ishigura Shintarō). In 1847, he became a pupil of wrestler Hatsushio Kyūgorō in Onomichi, Hiroshima. When Hatsushio died in 1848 he moved to Osaka and became a pupil of Asahiyama Shirouemon, fighting his first bout in 1850. He worked under Tokushima Domain and moved to Matsue Domain and then Satsuma Domain.

In 1850 he moved to Edo (now modern day Tokyo) and became a pupil of Hidenoyama Raigorō, the 9th yokozuna. He entered the makuuchi division in January 1858. In January 1867, he was initially awarded a yokozuna licence by the House of Gojo and not the Tokyo based House of Yoshida Tsukasa. He was awarded an official yokozuna licence in July 1867 but the November 1867 tournament became his last tournament. On December 25, 1867, he saw the beginnings of national strife and sent a letter to Saigo Takamori. He escaped from Edo and moved to Kyoto. The Boshin War began in January 1868 and he protected his master Shimazu Tadayoshi from harm.

Jinmaku won 87 bouts and lost only 5 bouts in the top makuuchi division. All his defeats came when he was ranked as a maegashira and sekiwake. He is the only wrestler to have never lost a bout as a yokozuna. His winning percentage reached 94.6.[1]

Yokozuna monument[edit]

In 1900 Jinmaku erected the Yokozuna Rikishi Memorial Monument in the grounds of the Tomioka Hachiman Shrine in the Koto ward of Tokyo. It was the culmination of a lengthy personal project to properly acknowledge all his fellow yokozuna.[2] For the first time, Akashi Shiganosuke, Ayagawa Goroji and Maruyama Gondazaemon were recognised as the first three yokozuna.[2]

Top division record[edit]

  • The actual time the tournaments were held during the year in this period often varied.
Jinmaku[3][4]
- Spring Winter
1858 East Maegashira #6
5–0–2
3d

 
Called off due to fire
1859 East Maegashira #7
3–0–6
1d

 
East Maegashira #2
6–2–1
1h

 
1860 East Maegashira #2
4–1–3
2d

 
East Maegashira #2
5–0
2d

 
1861 East Maegashira #2
9–0–1
Unofficial

 
East Maegashira #2
5–0–4
1d

 
1862 East Maegashira #2
4–1–4
1d

 
East Maegashira #2
5–0–3
2d

 
1863 East Sekiwake
7–0–2
1d

 
Sat out
1864 Not enrolled Sat out
1865 Sat out East Sekiwake
6–0–1
1d 1h
Unofficial

 
1866 East Sekiwake
6–1–2
1h

 
West Ōzeki
8–0–1
1d
Unofficial

 
1867 West Ōzeki
7–0–1
2d
Unofficial

 
West Ōzeki
7–0–3
Unofficial

 
1868
Retired
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Key:  =Kinboshi(s);   d=Draw(s) (引分);   h=Hold(s) (預り);   nr=no result recorded
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: 
Yokozuna (not ranked as such on banzuke until 1890)
ŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

*Championships for the best record in a tournament were not recognized or awarded before the 1909 summer tournament and the above unofficial championships are historically conferred. For more information see yūshō.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kuroda, Joe (February 2006). "A Shot At the Impossible-Yokozuna Comparison Through The Ages". sumofanmag.com. Retrieved 2008-07-03. 
  2. ^ a b Kuroda, Joe (April 2006). "The First Yokozuna (Akashi Shiganosuke) and the history of sumo's ultimate rank". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 2008-04-28. 
  3. ^ "Jinmaku Kyugoro Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2007-09-26. 
  4. ^ "大相撲優勝力士" (in Japanese). ja.wikipedia. Retrieved 2007-09-26. 

External links[edit]

Previous:
Shiranui Kōemon
12th Yokozuna
1867 - 1867
Next:
Kimenzan Tanigorō
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title