Joan Snyder

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Joan Snyder
Snyder joan download 3.jpg
Born (1940-04-16) April 16, 1940 (age 74)
Known for Painting

Joan Snyder (born April 16, 1940) is an American painter from New York. She is a MacArthur Fellow and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her paintings have been exhibited at several museums, including the de Saisset Museum and the Jewish Museum.

Painting styles[edit]

Joan Snyder's "stroke paintings" from the late 1960s and early 1970s were "abstract compositions, many of them quite large, that are loosely based on a grid format and that together constitute a dissection of the language of painting."[1] The 1980s and 1990s saw a refinement of her earlier vocabulary as "[...] brighter feminine colors and the grid returned. Written phrases, natural materials, and fabrics such as burlap and silks also appeared." [2]

Her paintings have been described by the Boston Globe as "abstract", "intuitive and spontaneous", and "pointedly political".[3] She also paints with a colorful style, using floral effects which are branded with paint sprinkled with a range of materials,[4] such as jewel-like metal objects.[5]

Exhibitions in museums[edit]

In 1978, Joan Snyder's paintings were exhibited in the Neuberger Museum at the State University of New York at Purchase.[6] Snyder's work has been featured at a number of museums. From June to August 1989,[7] Joan Snyder Collects Joan Snyder, a collection of Snyder's favorite paintings, was featured at the de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University.[8] From September to October 1989, this collection was exhibited at Sonoma State University.[7] In 2005, Joan Snyder: A Painting Survey, a retrospective collection of Snyder's paintings was exhibited at Danforth Art in Framingham, Massachusetts.[9]

Also in 2005, Joan Snyder: A Painting Survey, 1969–2005, a collection of 30 paintings about the Holocaust and AIDS by Snyder,[10] was displayed at the Jewish Museum in New York City.[11]

Honors and fellowships[edit]

Joan Snyder received a MacArthur Fellowship, which is often referred to as the "genius award",[12] in 2007.[13] She has received several other honors for her paintings including the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1974 and the Guggenheim Fellowship in 1983.[14]

Personal life[edit]

Joan Snyder was born in 1940 in Highland Park, New Jersey.[15] In 1962, she received her BA from Douglass Residential College,[16] which is part of Rutgers University. In 1966, she received her MFA from Douglass.[15]

In 1969, she married Larry Fink. Snyder had a miscarriage but later gave birth to a daughter named Molly in 1979.[17] Snyder and Fink lived in a farm in Pennsylvania before getting divorced later.[18]

In 1980, Snyder moved to Mulberry Street in Manhattan where she raised her daughter and painted in a nearby studio.[12] She later became afflicted with Lyme Disease. In 1989, she moved to Park Slope, Brooklyn so that she could be with her new partner, Maggie Cammer, who is a New York City Civil Court judge.[17][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solway, Carl. "Joan Snyder: Woman at Work" from the catalogue, Joan Snyder Painter 1969 to Now, Brandeis University, 1994.
  2. ^ "Joan Snyder: A Year in the Painting Life". The Brooklyn Rail. 
  3. ^ McQuaid, Cate (2005-11-16). "In drips, gobs, and blots, her paintings pulse with life". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  4. ^ Leffington, Edward (2007-06-01). "Joan Snyder at Betty Cuningham.". Art in America. Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  5. ^ Johnson, Ken (2001-05-18). "Art in Review Joan Snyder — 'Primary Fields'". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  6. ^ Shirley, David L. (1978-02-12). "About Westche$ter Spirited Feminist Wields Bold Brush". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  7. ^ a b Muchnic, Suzanne (1989-01-24). "Two Views of the 'Revival' of the Abstract". Los Angeles Times (Tribune Company). Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  8. ^ "Imagine the Look of Love — And Righteous Rage Joan Snyder Shows Paintings Far Too Personal to Put on Sale". San Jose Mercury News (MediaNews Group). 1989-05-05. Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  9. ^ Taylor, Denise (2005-11-10). "A lifetime of music and all that jazz". The Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  10. ^ Spiher, David (2005-09-01). "Focusing on the Act of Painting". Gay City News. Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  11. ^ Stevens, Mark (2005-09-11). "Iron Joan". New York Magazine. Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  12. ^ a b Orden, Erica (2007-09-25). "A MacArthur 'Genius' Wants Her Work Seen". The New York Sun. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  13. ^ "MacArthur Fellows 2007, Joan Snyder". John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Chicago. 2007-09. Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 16 December 2008. 
  14. ^ "Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art Feminist Art Base: Joan Snyder". Brooklyn Museum. Archived from the original on 2008-01-20. Retrieved 2009-01-25. 
  15. ^ a b Rosen, Randy; Brawer, Catherine Coleman (1989). Making Their Mark: Women Artists Move Into the Mainstream, 1970-85. Abbeville Press. p. 262. ISBN 0-89659-958-2. 
  16. ^ "Members of the Douglass Society". Associate Alumnae of Douglass College. Douglass Residential College. Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 2009-01-25. 
  17. ^ a b Cook, Greg (2005-11-25). "Old school". The Phoenix (Phoenix Media/Communications Group). Archived from the original on 2008-11-17. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  18. ^ Klein, Michael (1998-04-23). "Joan Snyder: Works on Paper". Artnet. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 
  19. ^ Sederstrom, Jotham (2007-09-26). "Talent-rich boro trio named newest MacArthur Fellows". Daily News of New York (Mortimer Zuckerman). Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 25 January 2009. 

Further reading[edit]

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