Joan Walsh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Joan Walsh
Born Joan Maureen Walsh
(1958-09-18) September 18, 1958 (age 56)
United States
Occupation Editor, writer, journalist

Joan Maureen Walsh (born September 18, 1958) is an American editor, writer, and blogger. She is editor-at-large of Salon.com and an MSNBC political analyst.

Career[edit]

From 2005 through 2010, she was the editor-in-chief of Salon.com, a San Francisco-based American liberal politics and culture Web site. She is the author of What's the Matter With White People? Why We Long for a Golden Age That Never Was, published in August 2012 by John Wiley and Sons.

She joined Salon as its first full-time news editor in 1998, and became managing editor in 2004. Walsh had previously worked for In These Times and the Santa Barbara News and Review. She has written freelance articles for a variety of newspapers and magazines, including the Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and The Nation.[1]

Walsh writes frequently on current American political topics, typically in blog form at Salon. Criticisms of the Iraq War, the George W. Bush administration and conservatives have been featured in her posts. She regularly appears on MSNBC's Scarborough Country[2] and Hardball with Chris Matthews as well as CNN's Campbell Brown, where she has debated with conservative guests including Pat Buchanan, Liz Cheney, Dick Armey, David Frum, Terry Jeffrey and G. Gordon Liddy. She also has appeared on MSNBC's Countdown with Keith Olbermann, The Rachel Maddow Show, The Ed Show, as well as CNN's Larry King Live and D. L. Hughley Breaks the News. Walsh made her second appearance on The O'Reilly Factor in June 2009, discussing the murder of George Tiller and her views on the responsibility of journalists and the impact of their words in controversial matters.[3]

Other areas of interest include education, community development, urban poverty issues and baseball. She has published two books, Splash Hit: The Pacific Bell Park Story and Stories of Renewal: Community Building and the Future of Urban America.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Joan Walsh: About Me". Salon.com. Retrieved May 29, 2007. 
  2. ^ "Scarborough Country for April 23". Scarborough Country. MSNBC. Retrieved May 29, 2007. 
  3. ^ Walsh, Joan (Je 12, 2009). "Why I went on "The O'Reilly Factor"". Salon.com. Retrieved June 16, 2009.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  4. ^ Montopoli, Brian. "Joan Walsh on Losing Subscriptions Over the Ohio Election, Conservative Ideological Crusades, and Being Compared to Judith Miller.". Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved May 29, 2007. 

External links[edit]

Media offices
Preceded by
David Talbot
Editor in Chief of Salon.com
2005–2010
Succeeded by
Kerry Lauerman
New title Editor at Large of Salon.com
2010–present
Incumbent