Joanna Woodall

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The cover of Portraiture: Facing the Subject, showing Ingres' painting Raphael and the Fornarina, c. 1814.

Joanna Woodall is a professor and art historian at the Courtauld Institute, London. Woodall specialises in portraiture and Netherlandish art and she is a member of the editorial board of the Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek (Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art).[1] Woodall is a former Assistant Curator at Christ Church Picture Gallery in Oxford. In 2010, Woodall was with a group of Courtauld students protesting about increased university tuition fees when they reportedly received rough treatment from the Metropolitan Police with Woodall herself being picked up by an officer and thrown into a group of protestors.[2]

Selected publications[edit]

  • Portraiture: Facing the Subject. Manchester University Press, Manchester, 1997. ISBN 0719046149
  • "Wtewael's Perseus and Andromeda: looking for love in seventeenth century Dutch painting" in C. Arscott and K. Scott eds., Manifestations of Venus. Art and Sexuality, Manchester University Press, Manchester, 2000.
  • Self Portrait. Renaissance to Contemporary. National Portrait Gallery, London and Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2005. (With Anthony Bond, Timothy J. Clark, Ludmilla J. Jordanova and Joseph Leo Koerner) ISBN 1855143569
  • Anthonis Mor. Art and Authority. Studies in Netherlandish Art and Cultural History Volume 8. Waanders Press, Zwolle, 2007. (With Tony Bond) ISBN 9789040084218
  • "A Woman's Place. Joanna Woodall 1982-1985", in Jacqueline Thalmann (ed.), 40 Years of Christ Church Picture Gallery. Still one of Oxford’s best kept secrets. 2008.
  • Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 59 (2009): Envisioning the Artist in the Early Modern Netherlands. Edited with H. Perry Chapman. 2010.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Professor Joanna Woodall. The Courtauld Institute, 2013. Retrieved 27 April 2013. Archived here.
  2. ^ Footage shows protester dragged from wheelchair by Michael Savage and Nigel Morris in The Independent, 14 December 2010. Archived here.

External links[edit]