Joanne Malar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Joanne Malar
Personal information
Full name Joanne Susan Malar
Nationality  Canada
Born (1975-10-30) October 30, 1975 (age 38)
Hamilton, Ontario
Height 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)
Sport
Sport Swimming
Stroke(s) Freestyle and Medley
College team University of Calgary[citation needed]

Joanne Malar (born October 30, 1975 in Hamilton, Ontario) is a former medley swimmer from Canada, who competed in three consecutive Summer Olympics, starting in 1992.

Early life[edit]

Swimming was important to her and her family, because her family camped often. She has two sisters and a brother, and speaks French. She attended McMaster University and St. Thomas More Catholic Secondary School.

Malar’s first pool experience was when she was five weeks old. She started racing at five. At ten, she set her first provincial record. Two years later, Malar went to her first national swim meet, the trials for the 1988 Olympic Games. Besides being a talented swimmer, she was a gifted basketball player. In grade nine, she chose swimming over basketball as her preferred sport.

Swimming career[edit]

When Malar began her swimming career, she impressed many people with her unexpected success early on. She began swimming competitively with HAC (Hamilton Aquatic Club) and still currently holds 20 SC records and 25 LC. At the 1991 Pan American Games, she won two silvers and a bronze. At the 1994 LC World Championships, she came in fourth for the 400m Individual Medley. In 1995, she won four golds and a bronze.

In 1995, at the 1995 FINA Short Course World Championships, she won two gold medals. That same year at the 1995 Pan American Games, she won a bronze and two gold medals, having developed a new swimming style.

There were high expectations for Malar to medal at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia. Due to her potential, she appeared on the box for Kellogg's Special K[2] (in a black bathing suit[3]) and a television ad for Salon Selectives Shampoo conditioner. In the 400m Medley, considered her strongest event, she failed to make the finals. In the 200m Medley, Malar finished fourth just narrowly missing the podium, while Canadian teammate Marianne Limpert took the silver. Ireland's Michelle Smith won that race, ending up with three gold medals from the Atlanta Games.

Malar won Gold at the 1998 Commonwealth Games.

In 1999, at the 1999 FINA Short Course World Championships, Malar achieved silver and bronze. At the 1999 Pan American Games and 1999 Pan Pacific Swimming Championships, she won two gold medals each time.

At the 2000 Summer Olympics, Malar finished fifth in the 200 Medley, with Limpert fourth. Malar also finished 7th in the 400m Medley.[5] Malar and Curtis Myden were sponsored by Sears Canada around these Games. The Sydney Olympics was a subpar performance for Swimming Canada, leading to heavy criticism of head coach Dave Johnson, as only medal was Curtis Myden's bronze.[4][5]

Three years later in May 2003, Malar revealed that she was coming out of retirement, a big surprise to many. At the 2003 Pan American Games she won one gold and came in fourth twice. Admittingly, countries use this event for international experience for the upcoming swimmers. Malar failed to qualify for the 2004 Olympics after she finished fourth in the 400m Medley.[6] She retired from competitive swimming afterwards, with 30 national titles and over 70 International medals to her name.

Retirement[edit]

Malar has done several interviews in her hometown of Hamilton for CH TV 11 and is also a Holistic Nutritionalist (RHN) for La Sante Life at the Regent Health Centre on 150 Locke street in Hamilton. She currently lives in Summerland, B.C where she helps coach the local swim club(Orca).She lives there with her second husband, Delano Ducheck, and their two sons Desmond and Mateo. She was previously married to former CFL player Mike Morreale.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Swimming Results". Retrieved 2007-08-04. 
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ "Swimming Canada dumps CEO". CBC News. December 17, 2000. 
  6. ^ [4]