Jodhpur State

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This article is about the state during the British Raj. For the natural and historical region, see Marwar.
Jodhpur State
जोधपुर
Princely State of British India
1250–1949
Flag Coat of arms
Flag Coat of arms
History
 -  Established 1250
 -  Independence of India 1949
Area
 -  1931 93,424 km2 (36,071 sq mi)
Population
 -  1931 2,125,000 
Density 22.7 /km2  (58.9 /sq mi)
View of Jodhpur palace.

Jodhpur State was a princely state in the Marwar region during the British Raj. Its capital was the city of Jodhpur since 1450.

Covering an area of 90,554 km2 (34,963 sq mi), Jodhpur State was the largest state under the Rajputana Agency. Its last ruler signed the accession to join the Indian Union on 7 April 1949 and the state was formally dissolved on 1 November 1956.[1]

History[edit]

The Rulers of the Indian Princely State of Jodhpur were of an ancient dynasty established in the 8th century. However, the dynasty's fortunes were made by Rao Jodha, first of the rulers of the Rathore dynasty in Jodhpur in 1459.

The state was incorporated into the Mughal Empire during the reign of the Emperor Akbar. During the late 17th century it was under the strict control of the Emperor Aurangzeb, but the ruling house of Rathore was allowed to remain semi-autonomous in their territory. The British had no role in the state's affairs until the 1830s, when the Raja at that time, Man Singh, entered into a subsidiary alliance, after which the Rajas of Marwar (or Jodhpur) continued as rulers of a princely state. Their reign continued until Maharaja Sir Hanwant Singh acceded his state to the new Dominion of India following Indian independence in 1947.[2]

House of Rathore (1250–1459)[edit]

Name[3] Reign Began Reign Ended
1 Rao Shiva 1250 1273
2 Rao AsthanHe was killed in battle against the forces of Sultan Jalal-ud-din Firuz Khilji of Delhi, 1292. 1273 1292
3 Rao Duhad 1292 1309
4 Rao Rai Pal 1309 1313
5 Rao Kanha Pal 1313 1323
6 Rao Jalhansi 1323 1328
7 Rao Chhada 1328 1344
8 Rao Tida 1344 1357
9 Rao Salkha 1357 1374
10 Rao Viram Deo 1374 1383
11 Rao ChandraHe was killed in battle against Salim Shah of Multan, 1424 1383 1424
12 Rao Kanha 1424 1427
13 Rao Rid Mal Ranmal 1427 1438

House of Rathore (1459–1947) at Jodhpur[edit]

Name[3] Reign Began Reign Ended
1 Rao Jodha of Mandore 12 May 1459 6 April 1489
2 Rao Satal 6 April 1489 March 1492
3 Rao Suja March 1492 2 October 1515
4 Rao Biram Singhson of Bagha 2 October 1515 8 November 1515
5 Rao Ganga 8 November 1515 9 May 1532
6 Rao MaldeoLost Merta and Ajmer to Emperor Akbar, and forced to send two of his sons as hostages to the Imperial Court. 9 May 1532 7 November 1562
7 Rao Chandra SenLost his territories in wars with the Mughals 7 November 1562 1565
8 Raja Udai Singh Mota Rajarestored by the Mughals with the title 'Raja' as a vassal 4 August 1583 11 July 1595
9 Sawai Raja Suraj-Mal 11 July 1595 7 September 1619
10 Maharaja Gaj Singh ITo be the first to take the title 'Maharaja' by himself 7 September 1619 6 May 1638
11 Maharaja Jaswant Singh 6 May 1638 28 November 1678?
12 Raja Rai SinghSon of Raja Amar Singh 1659 1659
13 Maharaja Ajit Singh - Rao Raghunath Singh Bhandari ruled as Maharaja in place of Ajit Singh from 1713-1724, while he was in Delhi 19 February 1679 24 June 1724
14 Raja Indra SinghInstalled in opposition to Maharaja Ajit Singh by Emperor Aurangzeb but unpopluar with people of Marwar 9 June 1679 4 August 1679
15 Maharaja Abhai Singh 24 June 1724 18 June 1749
16 Maharaja Ram SinghFirst Reign 18 June 1749 July 1751
17 Maharaja Bakht Singh July 1751 21 September 1752
18 Maharaja Vijay SinghFirst Reign 21 September 1752 31 January 1753
19 Maharaja Ram SinghSecond Reign 31 January 1753 September 1772
20 Maharaja Vijay SinghSecond Reign September 1772 17 July 1793
21 Maharaja Bhim Singh 17 July 1793 19 October 1803
22 Maharaja Man Singh 19 October 1803 4 September 1843
23 Maharaja Sir Takht SinghNot in the direct line, but a great-great-great grandson of Ajit Singh. Formerly Regent of Ahmednagar. 4 September 1843 13 February 1873
24 Maharaja Sir Jaswant Singh IIKaisar-i-Hind 13 February 1873 11 October 1895
25 Maharaja Sir Sardar SinghColonel in the British Indian Army 11 October 1895 20 March 1911
26 Maharaja Sir Sumair SinghColonel in the British Indian Army 20 March 1911 3 October 1918
27 Maharaja Sir Umaid SinghLieutenant-General in the British Indian Army 3 October 1918 9 June 1947
28 Maharaja Sir Hanwant SinghLast Ruler of Marwar (Jodhpur) 9 June 1947 15 August 1947
Maharaja Jai Singh of Amber and Maharaja Gaj Singh of Marwar - Folio from the Amber Album, circa 1630 Painting

Heads of the Rathore Clan 1947–1952[edit]

XXIX. Maharaja Shri Gaj Singh II (13 January 1948–) r. 26 January 1952–. eldest son of Maharaja Shri Hanwant Singh

  1. Rao Raja Hukum Singh [Tutu Bana Jodhpur] Second son of Maharaja Shri Hanwant Singh (mother name Zubaida ), born 1952 to 1980
    1. Rao Raja Parikshit Singh (son of Rao Raja Hukum Singh Tutu Banna)
    2. Rajkumari Jayanandini Kumari, (daughter of Rao Raja Hukum Singh Tutu Banna) married Kunwar Vikramaditya Singh of Palaitha-Kotah.[3][4]

Present Line of Succession[edit]

The House of Rathore follows male primogeniture by the sons of Rajput mothers only.

  • 1. Yuvraj Shivraj Singh of Jodhpur (b. 1975). Son of the present Maharaja.
  • 2. Maharaj Shri RK Yashwant Singh (b. 1953). Grandson of HH Maharaja Umaid Singh by his second son Lt.col Maharaj Dhiraj Himmat Singh known as, Bichla BaapJi.
  • 3. Maharaj Shri RK Rajendra Singh (b. 1954). Grandson of HH Maharaja Umaid Singh by his second son Lt.col Maharaj Dhiraj Himmat Singh known as, Bichla BaapJi.
  • 3.. Maharaj Shri Dalip Singh (b. 1937). Youngest son of Maharaja Umaid Singh.
  • 4. Rajkumar Shri Vir Vikram Singh (b. 1967). Only son of Dalip Singh.
  • 5. Bhanwar Shri Aditya Singh (b. 1996). Only son of Vir Vikram Singh.
  • 6. Maharaj Shri Shobagh Singh (b. 1928). Grandson of Maharaja Sardar Singh through his youngest son "Maharajadhiraja Shri Sir Ajit Singh (1907–1978).
  • 7. Rajkumar Shri Ranvijay Singh (b. 1959). Elder son of Shobagh Singh.
  • 8. Bhanwar Shri Abhay Singh (b. 1996). Only son of Ranvijay Singh.
  • 9. Rajkumar Shri Karanvijay Singh (b. 1966). Younger son of Shobagh Singh.
  • 10. Bhanwar Shri Janmejay Singh (b. 1998). Elder son of Karanvijay Singh.
  • 11. Bhanwar Shri Kartikeya Singh (b. 2010). Second son of Karanvijay Singh.
  • 12. Maharaj Shri Raghavendra Rathore (b. 1967). Son of Maharaj Shri Swaroop Singh (1933–2003), the younger brother of Shobagh Singh.
  • 13. Rajkumar Shri Amar Singh (b. 2004).Son of Raghavendra Rathore.
  • 14. Maharaj Shri Suryaveer Singh Rathore.(b. 1972). Younger brother of Raghavendra Rathore.
  • 15. Rajkumar Shri Samarvir Singh.(b. 2001). Elder son of Mh. Suryaveer Singh Rathore.
  • 16. Rajkumar Shri Hanut Singh.(b. 2007). Younger son of Mh. Suryaveer Singh Rathore.

[5] [6]

Thikanas[edit]

Jiliya or Abhaypura was a Princely Thikana of the State of Jodhpur.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ William Barton, The princes of India. Delhi 1983
  2. ^ Rajput Provinces of India - Jodhpur (Princely State)
  3. ^ a b c Jodhpur. Royalark.net. Retrieved on 2011-10-29.
  4. ^ http://uqconnect.net/~zzhsoszy/ips/j/jodhpur.html
  5. ^ JODH15. Royalark.net. Retrieved on 2011-10-29.
  6. ^ JODH14. Royalark.net. Retrieved on 2011-10-29.
  • Jodhpur, Published by [s.l.], 1933.
  • Maharaja Man Singh of Jodhpur and His Times (1803–1843 A.D.), by Padmaja Sharma. Published by Shiva Lal Agarwala, 1972.
  • The Administration of Jodhpur State, 1800–1947 A.D., by Nirmala M. Upadhyaya. International Publishers, 1973.
  • Marwar under Jaswant Singh, (1658–1678): Jodhpur hukumat ri bahi, by Satish Chandra, Raghubir Sinh, Ghanshyam Datt Sharma. Published by Meenakshi Prakashan, 1976.
  • Jodhpur, Bikaner, Jaisalmer: Desert Kingdoms, by Kishore Singh, Karoki Lewis. Lustre Press Ltd. 1992.
  • The House of Marwar: The Story of Jodhpur, by Dhananajaya Singh. Lotus Collection, Roli Books, 1994. ISBN 81-7436-002-6.
  • Modern Indian Kingship: Tradition, Legitimacy & Power in Jodhpur, by Marzia Balzani. Published by James Currey Limited, 2003. ISBN 0-85255-931-3.
  • Jodhpur and the Later Mughals, AD 1707–1752, by R. S. Sangwan. Published by Pragati Publications, 2006.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 26°28′N 73°02′E / 26.467°N 73.033°E / 26.467; 73.033