Joe Cocker (album)

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Joe Cocker
Studio album by Joe Cocker
Released November 1972
Recorded 1971–1972
Genre Blues-rock, Southern rock
Length 42:28
Label A&M
SP 4368
Producer Denny Cordell and Nigel Thomas
Joe Cocker chronology
Mad Dogs and Englishmen
(1970)
Joe Cocker
(1972)
I Can Stand a Little Rain
(1974)
Singles from Joe Cocker
  1. "High Time We Went
    b/w Black-Eyed Blues
    A&M 1258"
  2. "Midnight Rider
    b/w Woman to Woman
    A&M 1370"
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[1]
Robert Christgau (B+)[2]

Joe Cocker is the third studio album by Joe Cocker, released in 1972 in Europe as Something to Say on Cube Records, and in the USA as Joe Cocker on A&M Records. It contains the hit single "High Time We Went", that was released in the summer of 1971. Joe Cocker signalled Cocker's change of direction into a more jazzy, blues style. The album reached no. 30 in the US album charts. However, although it received a positive response from the press, it made no impression on the British and European charts.

It's an unusual LP among Joe Cocker albums, in that he wrote the lyrics to six songs. All of them were co-written with Chris Stainton between 1969 and 1972. However, the album's main claim to fame might be the fact that one of its tracks, "Woman to Woman", was the basis for Tupac Shakur's successful hit single "California Love".

The album, re-titled as Something to Say, was originally released on CD in 1990 by Castle Communications and in 1998 a remastered edition of the album was released worldwide on A&M Records.

Track listing[edit]

All tracks composed by Joe Cocker and Chris Stainton; except where indicated

Side One[edit]

  1. "Pardon Me Sir" – 3:37
  2. "High Time We Went" – 4:25
  3. "She Don't Mind" – 3:13
  4. "Black-Eyed Blues" – 4:37
  5. "Something to Say" (Joe Cocker, Peter Nichols) – 5:00

Side Two[edit]

  1. "Midnight Rider" (Gregg Allman, Robert Payne) – 4:00
  2. "Do Right Woman" (live) (Dan Penn, Chips Moman) – 7:00
  3. "Woman to Woman" – 4:26
  4. "St. James Infirmary" (live) (Frey Assunto) – 6:10

On the album's release, the tracks that received the most attention on radio were "Black-Eyed Blues", "Woman to Woman" and the cover version of Gregg Allman's "Midnight Rider", which charted on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number 27.

In 1996, the horn-and-piano riff from "Woman to Woman" was sampled by Tupac Shakur in his song "California Love"; it was a smash hit for Tupac, reaching No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Personnel[edit]

  • Joe Cocker: Vocals
  • Chris Stainton: Piano and organ
  • Allan Spenner: Bass guitar
  • Neil Hubbard: Guitar
  • Jim Keltner: Drums
  • Alan White: Drums
  • Felix Falcon: Assorted percussion
  • Rick Alphonso: Trumpet
  • Fred Scerbo: Saxophone
  • Milton Sloane: Saxophone
  • Jim Horn: Saxophone on "Do Right Woman"
  • Reebop: Congas on "Do Right Woman"
  • Gloria Jones: Backing Vocals
  • Viola Wills: Backing Vocals. Lead vocal on "Do Right Woman"
  • Virginia Ayers: Backing Vocals
  • Beverly Gardner: Backing Vocals
  • Conrad Isidore: Drums on "Do Right Woman" and "St. James Infirmary"

(A sticker placed on original issue albums read "Featuring the Chris Stainton Band and the Sanctified Sisters")

Production notes[edit]

  • All songs recorded in 1972, except "High Time We Went" and "Black Eyed Blues", which were recorded in 1971; "Do Right Woman" and "St. James Infirmary" recorded live
  • Produced by Denny Cordell ("She Don't Mind", "Pardon Me Sir, "Black-Eyed Blues, "High Time We Went", "Something to Say")
  • Produced by Nigel Thomas ("Woman to Woman", "Do Right Woman")
  • Produced by Denny Cordell and Nigel Thomas ("Midnight Rider", "St. James Infirmary")

Trivia[edit]

When A&M placed an advertisement for the album in Creem magazine, the ad copy read: "There is only one man in the world who can release an album named 'Joe Cocker'"

References[edit]

All song and personnel information gathered from the liner notes of the album Joe Cocker (Copyright © 1972 by A&M Records), as issued by A&M Records in the U.S.