Joe T. May

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Joe Turner May
Delegate Joe T. May.png
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 33rd district
In office
January 12, 1994 – January 8, 2014
Preceded by Linda Wallace
Succeeded by Dave LaRock
Personal details
Born Joseph Turner May
( 1937 -06-08) June 8, 1937 (age 77)
Broadway, Virginia
Political party Independent
Other political
affiliations
Independent Greens
Republican
Spouse(s) Roberta Compton Downs
Children Susan May
Elaine May Attridge
Residence Leesburg, Virginia
Alma mater Virginia Tech
Profession Electrical engineer
Committees Transportation
Appropriations
Science and Technology
Religion Church of the Brethren
Military service
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1955–1958
Rank Second lieutenant
Unit United States Army Reserve

Joe Turner May (born June 8, 1937) is an American businessman, electrical engineer, inventor, and politician.

Biography[edit]

Born on June 8, 1937 in Broadway, Virginia, May graduated from Virginia Tech in 1959. Between 1955–1958, he served in the United States Army Reserve.

In 1977, May founded EIT, a Sterling-based electronics manufacturer.[1] May holds over twenty patents in the fields of electrical and electronic engineering.[1][2]

Between 1994 and 2014, he served in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 33rd district. The district is includes parts of Clarke, Frederick and Loudoun counties. May, a self described moderate, was a member of the Republican Party caucus.[1][3] During his time in the House of Delegates, May was co-chair of the Science and Technology committee between 1998–2001, and chair between 2002–2007. Between 2008–2014, he was chair of the committee on Transportation.[3]

In June 2013, Dave LaRock – aligned with the Tea Party – defeated May in the 33rd district Republican primary.[4]

In December 2013, May announced his candidacy in a special election to succeed Democratic Attorney General-elect Mark Herring, in the Virginia State Senate. After the Republican Party decided to choose its candidate through a "mass meeting" instead of a primary, May declared he would run as an independent.[5] May was endorsed by both the conservative-leaning National Federation of Independent Business[6] and the centralist Independent Greens Party.[7] On election day, May garnered 10% of the vote, while the Democratic and Republican candidates received 53% and 38%, respectively.

May and his wife, Roberta Compton Downs, currently rides in Leesburg, Virginia. They have two daughters, Susan May and Elaine May Attridge.

Electoral history[edit]

Date Election Candidate Party Votes  %
Virginia House of Delegates, 33rd district
November 2, 1993[8] General Joe T. May Republican 9,773 51.9%
Jean S. Brown Democratic 8,736 46.4%
Christina Nelson Huth Independent 323 1.7%
Linda Wallace retired; seat stayed Republican
November 7, 1995[9] General Joe T. May Republican 10,090 61.7%
Richard D. Winter Democratic 6,239 37.4%
Write Ins 4 0.02%
November 4, 1997[10] General Joe T. May Republican 11,976 59.6%
Kenneth P. Halla Democratic 6,563 32.7%
Robert E. Primack Independent Greens 1,536 7.7%
Write Ins 15 0.1%
November 2, 1999[11] General Joe T. May Republican 14,095 98.8%
Write Ins 167 1.2%
Nov 6, 2001[12] General Joe T. May Republican 17,107 98.1%
Write Ins 328 1.9%
Nov 4, 2003[13] General Joe T. May Republican 16,031 98.1%
Write Ins 311 1.9%
Jun 14, 2005[14] Republican primary Joy T. May 2,974 59.8%
Christopher G. Oprison 1,999 40.2%
November 8, 2005[15] General Joe T. May Republican 20,621 91.8%
Write Ins 1,847 8.2%
November 6, 2007[16] General Joe T. May Republican 14,978 59.8%
Marty Martinez Democratic 10,029 40.1%
Write Ins 35 0.1%
November 3, 2009[17] General Joe T. May Republican 22,489 96.9%
Write Ins 722 3.1%
November 8, 2011[18] General Joe T. May Republican 13,027 97.4%
Write Ins 346 2.6%
June 4, 2013[19] Republican primary Dave LaRock 2,958 57.3%
Joe T. May 2,201 42.7%
Virginia State Senate, 33rd district
January 21, 2014[20] Special election Jennifer Wexton Democratic 11,427 52.7%
John Whitbeck Republican 8,128 37.5%
Joe T. May Independent 2,119 9.8%
Write Ins 3 0.01%

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ben Pershing (2013-01-20). "Joe May looks for the middle ground in special election for control of Virginia Senate". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2013-01-20. 
  2. ^ "Joe May is inducted into the Academy of Engineering Excellence". Bradley Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering, Virginia Tech. 2009-05-01. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  3. ^ a b "Bio for Joe T. May". Virginia House of Delegates. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  4. ^ Ben Pershing and Errin Whack (2013-06-11). "Democrats give nod to Northam, Herring in statewide races". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2013-06-12. 
  5. ^ Caitlin Gibson (2013-06-11). "May breaks from GOP, will run as Independent in race for Herring’s seat". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2013-06-12. 
  6. ^ "Business Group Endorses May For State Senate". Leesburg Today. Retrieved 2014-01-05. 
  7. ^ "Independent Green Party endorsee Joe May for State Senate 33rd District". votejoinrun.us. Retrieved 2013-12-25. 
  8. ^ "The Virginia Elections and State Elected Officials Database Project, 1776-2007". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  9. ^ "1995 Election Results - HOD". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  10. ^ "1997 Election Results - HOD". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  11. ^ "Election Results - House of Delegates - Nov 1999 Gen Election". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  12. ^ "General Election- November 6, 2001". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  13. ^ "General Election- November 4, 2003". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  14. ^ "Primary Election- June 14, 2005". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  15. ^ "General Election- November 8, 2005". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  16. ^ "November 6, 2007 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  17. ^ "November 2009 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  18. ^ "November 2011 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  19. ^ "June 2013 Primary Election Preliminary Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. 
  20. ^ "May Secures Spot On Special Election Ballot". Leesburg Today. Retrieved 2013-12-30. 

External links[edit]