Joe Yeager

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Joe Yeager
Joe Yeager.jpg
Third baseman/Pitcher
Born: (1875-08-28)August 28, 1875
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died: July 2, 1937(1937-07-02) (aged 61)
Detroit, Michigan
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 22, 1898 for the Brooklyn Bridegrooms
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1908 for the St. Louis Browns
Career statistics
Batting average .252
Home runs 4
Runs batted in 201
Win–loss record 33-49
Earned run average 3.74
Strikeouts 145
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Joseph Francis Yeager (August 28, 1875 – July 2, 1937), nicknamed "Little Joe," was a professional baseball player. He played 10 seasons in Major League Baseball with the Brooklyn Superbas (1898–1900), Detroit Tigers (1901–03), New York Highlanders (1905–06), and St. Louis Browns (1907–08). Born in Philadelphia, Little Joe Yeager played in 574 major league games, including 295 as a third baseman, 94 as a pitcher, 83 as a shortstop, 48 as a second baseman, and 18 as an outfielder.

In his rookie season, Yeager was a pitcher for the Brooklyn Superbas. He had 32 complete games and a respectable earned run average but lost 22 games for a Superbas team that finished in 10th place.

Yeager played for the Detroit Tigers as a right-handed starting pitcher during their first major league season in 1901. He pitched 199.2 innings in 1901, with 22 complete games, 2 shutouts, and a 12–11 record. His 2.61 earned run average was 3rd-best in the American League behind Cy Young, and his adjusted ERA+ of 147 was 2nd-best in the league behind Cy Young. Yeager also played 12 games at shortstop for the 1901 Tigers and had a batting average of .296 with a .343 on-base percentage and .416 slugging percentage.

After a 6–12 season as a pitcher in 1902, Yeager made the switch from pitcher to third baseman. He was the Tigers' starting third baseman in 1903 and went on to play third base for the New York Highlanders and St. Louis Browns.

Yeager is credited by some with originating the squeeze play.[1]

Yeager died in Detroit, Michigan in 1937.

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