Joel Kleefisch

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Joel Kleefisch
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the 38th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
2005
Preceded by Steven Foti[1]
Personal details
Born (1971-06-08) June 8, 1971 (age 43)
Waukesha, Wisconsin, U.S.
Nationality United States
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Rebecca Kleefisch
Residence Oconomowoc, Wisconsin
Alma mater Pepperdine University
Profession Politician
Religion Evangelical Christianity

Joel M. Kleefisch (born June 8, 1971) is an American politician and a former television reporter.[2] His wife, Rebecca Kleefisch, is also in state politics as the current Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin.

Biography[edit]

Born in Waukesha, Wisconsin, Kleefisch graduated from Waukesha North High School in 1989. He attended Pepperdine University and received a B.A. from Pepperdine in 1993.[3]

Kleefisch worked as a news researcher for KCBS-TV in Los Angeles during the summer of 1992. Upon graduation from Pepperdine he worked as a reporter for WREX-TV in Rockford, Illinois from 1993 to 1994.[4] Kleefisch then was hired by WISN-TV as an assignment desk person and part-time reporter in 1994 before becoming a full-time general assignment reporter, where he worked until entering politics. As a reporter at WISN-TV, he appeared on CNN to discuss the trial of Mark Chmura.[5] He won an award for "Best investigative report or series" from the Milwaukee Press Club in 1999 for a piece about date rape drugs.[6] Rebecca was also a reporter and anchor for WISN and the two would marry in 1999 shortly after she moved to that station from Rockford, Illinois.[7] The couple now have two children.

Kleefisch was elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly in 2004, and was re-elected in 2006, 2008 and 2010.[4] He represents Oconomowoc and surrounding areas. In 2009 he co-sponsored legislation to increase the penalties in Wisconsin for driving under the influence.[8]

On February 21, 2012, video was posted showing Kleefisch voting for absent members of the Assembly.[9] Although representatives claim that this practice is commonplace, and indeed legal as long as unseated members are actually inside the chamber itself,[10] claims by the person who captured the video that absent members had been absent for hours before the vote have spurred allegations of voter fraud.[9]


References[edit]

  1. ^ [1][dead link]
  2. ^ 'The State of Wisconsin Blue Book 2009-2010. Biographical sketch of Joel Kleefisch, p. 45
  3. ^ "Joel Kleefisch, Currently Elected State Representative District 38, Wisconsin". Vote-la.org. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Assembly Member Joel Kleefisch - Biography - Project Vote Smart". Votesmart.org. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  5. ^ "CNN Transcript - Burden of Proof: Mark Chmura On Trial: Former Pro Football Player Accused of Sexually Assaulting 17-Year-Old Babysitter - February 2, 2001". Transcripts.cnn.com. 2 February 2001. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  6. ^ "Contest & Honors presented by The Milwaukee Press Club". Milwaukeepressclub.org. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  7. ^ [2][dead link]
  8. ^ "Wisconsin Legislature: Kleefisch, Rep. Joel M.(38th A.Dist.; Rep.)". Nxt.legis.state.wi.us. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "Proof Of Voter Fraud In The Wisconsin State Assembly". YouTube. 21 February 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  10. ^ "Possible Voter Fraud by Joel Kleefisch". YouTube. 22 February 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 

External links[edit]