Jogendra Nath Mandal

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Jogendranath Mandal
1st Minister of Law and Justice
In office
15 August 1947 – 8 October 1950
Monarch George VI
Governor General Muhammad Ali Jinnah
Khawaja Nazimuddin
Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan
1st Minister of Labour
In office
15 August 1947 – 8 October 1950
Monarch George VI
President Liaquat Ali Khan
Governor General Muhammad Ali Jinnah
Khawaja Nazimuddin
2nd Minister of Commonwealth and Kashmir Affairs
In office
1 October 1949 – 8 October 1950
Monarch George VI
Governor General Muhammad Ali Jinnah
Khawaja Nazimuddin
Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan
Personal details
Born (1904-01-29)29 January 1904
Bengal, British India
Died 5 October 1968(1968-10-05) (aged 64)
Bangaon, West Bengal, India
Citizenship Indian (1904–1947)
Pakistan (1947–1968)
Nationality Pakistani
Political party Muslim League

Jogendra Nath Mandal ( Bengali: যোগেন্দ্রনাথ মণ্ডল; 29 January 1904 – 5 October 1968), was one of the central and leading Founding Fathers[1][2] of modern state of Pakistan, and legislator serving as country's first minister of law and labour, and also was second minister of commonwealth and Kashmir affairs.[3] An Indian and later Pakistani statesman who served as the first minister of law and labour in Pakistan. As leader of the Scheduled Castes, Jogendranath had made common cause with the Muslim League in their demand[citation needed] for Pakistan, hoping that the Scheduled Castes would be benefited from it and joined the first cabinet in Pakistan as the Minister of Law and Labour. He migrated to India a few years after partition after submitting his resignation to Liaquat Ali Khan, the then Prime Minister of Pakistan.

Political career in Pakistan[edit]

Following the partition of India on 15 August 1947 Mandal became a member and temporary chairman of the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan, and agreed to serve as the new state's first Minister for Law and Labour – becoming the highest-ranking Hindu member of the government.[citation needed] From 1947 to 1950 he lived in the port city of Karachi, which became Pakistan's capital.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Heyworth-Dunne, James (1952). Pakistan: the birth of a new Muslim state. University of Michigan: Renaissance Bookshop. p. 173. ASIN B000N7G1MG. 
  2. ^ Tai Yong Tan, Gyanes Kugaisya (2000). The Aftermath of partition in South Asia:Pakistan. London, UK.: Routledge Publishing Co. pp. ix–327. ISBN 0-203-45766-8. 
  3. ^ Ahmad, Salahuddin (2004). Bangladesh: Past and Present. New Delhi, India: APH Publishing Co. pp. 19–371. ISBN 978-81-7648-469-5. 

Bibliography[edit]

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