Johann Andreas Amon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Johann Andreas Amon (1763 – March 29, 1825) was a German virtuoso horn player, violist, conductor and composer.[1] Amon composed around fifty works, including symphonies, concerti, sonatas, and songs. He also wrote two masses, various liturgical works, and two operettas.

Amon was born at Bamberg, Bavaria in 1763, being first instructed in singing by the court singer Madame Fracassini, then later in instrumental work by Giovanni Punto, who took Amon to Paris to study composition with Antonio Sacchini in 1781. Amon then traveled with Punto, often leading his orchestra, until 1789, when he became the musical director at Heilbronn. In 1817, he became kapellmeister to the Prince of Oettingen-Wallerstein, continuing in this position until his death at Wallerstein, Bavaria in 1825.[2]

Selected works[edit]

Concertante
  • Concerto No. 1 in A major for viola and orchestra, Op. 10 (1799); The solo viola part is written in the key of G major requiring a scordatura tuning a whole step higher.[3]
  • Concerto No. 2 in E major for viola and orchestra; The solo viola part is written in the key of E major requiring a scordatura tuning a half step higher.[3]
  • Concerto for piano and orchestra, Op. 34 (1805)
  • Concerto for flute and orchestra, Op. 44 (1807)
Chamber music
  • 6 Duos for violin and viola, Op. 2 (1791)
  • 3 String Trios, Op. 8 (c.1800)
  • 3 Sonatas for piano and violin, Op. 11
  • 3 Concertante Quartets for solo viola and string trio, Op. 15
  • Quartet for solo viola and string trio, Op. 18 No. 3 (1803)
  • Quintet for flute, viola and string trio, Op. 19 No. 3
  • 3 Quartets for horn, violin, viola and cello, Op. 20
  • 3 Sonatas for piano and violin (1805); arranged from 3 Quartets, Op. 9 by Ferdinand Fränzl
  • 3 Quartets for flute, violin, viola and cello, Op. 42 (1806)
  • Divertissement for violin, viola, cello and guitar Op. 46 (1807)
  • 2 Sonatas for flute, cello and piano Op. 48 (1820)
  • 3 Quartets for oboe, violin, viola and cello, Op. 92 (1828?)
  • 3 Quartets for horn, violin, viola and cello, Op. 109

References[edit]

  1. ^ Riley, Maurice W. (1991), "Brief Biographies of Violists", The History of the Viola, Volume II, Ann Arbor, Michigan: Braun-Brumfield, pp. 358–359 
  2. ^ John Denison Champlin and William Foster Apthorp, Cyclopedia of Music and Musicians (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1893), 46.
  3. ^ a b Riley, Maurice W. (1991). "Scordatura for the Viola". The History of the Viola, Volume II. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Braun-Brumfield. p. 140. 

External links[edit]