Johann Chrysostom Magnenus

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Johann Chrysostom Magnenus (Jean Chrysostôme Magnen) (fl. 1645) was a French physician and advocate of atomism.

Life[edit]

He was born at Luxeuil.[1] He took a medical degree at the University of Dôle.[2] He joined the medical faculty at the University of Pavia, where he published his scientific work Democritus reviviscens.

Title page of Democritus reviviscens (1646).

Views[edit]

He cited Daniel Sennert, but his ideas were distinct from Sennert's and those of Democritus. He considered that atoms were the indivisible parts of three of the classical elements: earth, water and fire.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://galileo.rice.edu/Catalog/NewFiles/magnenus.html
  2. ^ Francesco Bottin, Models of the History of Philosophy: From its origins in the Renaissance to the "historia philosophica" (1993), pp. 133–4; Google Books.
  3. ^ Daniel Garber, Michael Ayers (editors), The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-century Philosophy, Volume 1 (2003), p. 556; Google Books.

External links[edit]