Johannesburg South Africa Temple

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Johannesburg South Africa Temple
The Johannesburg South Africa Temple seen from a distance
The Johannesburg South Africa Temple seen from a distance
Number 36 edit data
Dedication 24 August 1985 (24 August 1985) by
Gordon B. Hinckley
Site 1 acre (0.4 hectares)
Floor area 19,184 sq ft (1,782 m2)
Height 112 ft (34 m)
Preceded by Chicago Illinois Temple
Followed by Seoul Korea Temple
Official websiteNews & images

Coordinates: 26°10′40.98359″S 28°2′21.10199″E / 26.1780509972°S 28.0391949972°E / -26.1780509972; 28.0391949972 The Johannesburg South Africa Temple is the 36th operating temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

In April 1981, LDS Church leaders announced the building of a temple in Parktown, Johannesburg, South Africa. Groundbreaking took place on 27 November 1982. Great effort went into preserving the area's historical value. Once the site of estates built by nineteenth-century mining magnates and financiers, the area around the temple now features hospitals, office buildings, and schools, many of which are housed in mansions from the Victorian era.[1]

The temple is visible from many parts of the city with its six spires reaching into the sky. The edges of the building are finished with tiered layers of face brick, immaculately fitted together, giving it an elegance and distinctiveness.[2] A gray slate roof and indigenous quartzite for the temple's perimeter walls and entrance archways, allow the building to suitably fit in with the historic buildings nearby.[1]

Gordon B. Hinckley dedicated the temple on 24 August 1985. Although additional temples have been announced in Durban, South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Johannesburg temple currently serves church members from the Republic of Congo, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique, Tanzania, Zambia, and Madagascar.

The temple has a total floor area of 19,184 square feet (1,782.3 m2), four ordinance rooms, and three sealing rooms.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hawkins, Chad (2001). The First 100 Temples, page 100[full citation needed]
  2. ^ Davie, Lucille (July 2004). The Church Commissioned by God. Johannesburg News Agency.

External links[edit]