John-Paul Langbroek

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The Honourable
John-Paul Langbroek
MP
Jplangbroek.jpg
Minister for Education, Training and Employment of Queensland
Incumbent
Assumed office
3 April 2012
Premier Campbell Newman
Preceded by Cameron Dick (Education)
Stirling Hinchliffe (Employment)
33rd Leader of the Opposition of Queensland
In office
2 April 2009 – 11 April 2011
Deputy Lawrence Springborg
Preceded by Lawrence Springborg
Succeeded by Jeff Seeney
Leader of the Liberal National Party
In office
2 April 2009 – 11 April 2011
Deputy Lawrence Springborg
Preceded by Lawrence Springborg
Succeeded by Campbell Newman
Member of the Queensland Parliament
for Surfers Paradise
Incumbent
Assumed office
7 February 2004
Preceded by Lex Bell
Personal details
Born John-Paul Honoré Langbroek
(1961-01-31) 31 January 1961 (age 53)
Assen, Netherlands
Political party Liberal National Party
Spouse(s) Stacey Langbroek
Nickname(s) JP

John-Paul Honoré Langbroek (born 31 January 1961 in Assen) is an Australian politician who is the Minister for Education, Training and Employment in Queensland.[1] He has been a member of the Legislative Assembly of Queensland representing the Liberal Party and its successor, the centre-right Liberal National Party, in the seat of Surfers Paradise since 2004. He was Leader of the Opposition and parliamentary leader of the LNP from 2009 to 2011—the first person from the Liberal side of the merger to hold the post.

Early life[edit]

He and his sister, Melbourne-based media personality Kate Langbroek, grew up as the only two children of Jehovah's Witnesses. His family emigrated from the Netherlands to Australia in mid 1961. The family travelled around rural Queensland where Langbroek Sr worked at various schools.

Early career[edit]

A graduate of Sunnybank State High School, he went on to study at the University of Queensland, receiving an honours degree in Dental Science.[2] At university he showed no early sign of an interest in politics, describing his student days at the University of Queensland as being "toga parties, Lacoste shirts and university japes".[3]

He finished his degree in 1983 and departed for London where he met his wife Stacey. He won the state seat of Surfers Paradise from one-term independent MP Lex Bell at the 2004 state election and Bell had previously defeated him in the 2001 by-election for the seat. The Surfers Paradise by-election was triggered by the resignation of the previous member, former National Party Premier Rob Borbidge who had just led the Coalition to a landslide defeat in the general election earlier in 2001. Although unsuccessful Langbroek did win a lion's share of the vote that Borbidge had won as the National Party candidate at the aforementioned election. As a result the National Party never contested again Surfers Paradise prior to the merger of the Liberal and National Parties into the Liberal National Party.[4] As an MP he had served in the opposition shadow ministry for a number of years. He has held various shadow portfolios, including health, public works, mines and energy and immediately prior to his ascension to the leadership he has served as Shadow Minister for Education and Skills and Shadow Minister for the Arts from 12 August 2008.[5]

Leader of the Opposition[edit]

Langbroek was elected leader of the LNP following the 2009 state election after the LNP's first leader, Lawrence Springborg, announced his retirement. Langbroek named Springborg as his deputy.[6] Polling for much of 2009 and 2010 showed the LNP ahead of Labor on the two-party vote, and Langbroek consistently led incumbent Labor Premier Anna Bligh as preferred premier. However, after Labor's numbers rebounded in the wake of the Queensland floods, Langbroek came under growing pressure from the LNP's organisational wing to stand down.[7] According to Nine News Queensland's Spencer Jolly, LNP president Bruce McIver was trying to engineer a by-election to get Brisbane Lord Mayor Campbell Newman, also from the Liberal side of the merger, elected to the legislature so Newman could challenge Langbroek for the LNP leadership.[8]

On 22 March 2011, Newman announced he would be seeking pre-selection for the seat of Ashgrove, and would challenge for the LNP leadership if successful. Later that day, Langbroek and Springborg announced their resignations as leader and deputy leader, respectively.[9] While a February poll showed the LNP with 55 percent two-party support—enough to make Langbroek premier—internal Coalition polling suggested that under Newman, the LNP would win government "in a canter".[10] As late as the previous day, Langbroek had insisted that he would not resign, and even demanded that McIver and the rest of the organisational wing either back down from their attempts to push him out or resign themselves. He appeared to have the support of most of the party room as well. However, within hours of Newman's announcement, Langbroek gave way.[7]

Newman appointed Langbroek Shadow Police Minister in his Shadow Cabinet.[11]

Personal[edit]

Langbroek is married and has three children. Although he has not shown a clear rejection of his parents' religion (Jehovah's Witnesses), he does not discuss the topic at length.[3] He has expressed the pain of having a relative with motor neurone disease. Describing the disease as having "destroyed his family", causing his 58-year-old brother-in-law to need constant nursing and causing potentially fatal weight loss.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Premier Campbell Newman announces Queensland Government's new ministry". Courier Mail. 30 March 2012. Retrieved 30 March 2012. 
  2. ^ [1][dead link]
  3. ^ a b Andrew Fraser and Sean Parnell (3 April 2009). "Dentist in the chair". Theaustralian.news.com.au. Retrieved 3 February 2011. 
  4. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/elections/qld/2012/guide/surf.htm
  5. ^ "John-Paul Langbroek Biography". Parliament.qld.gov.au. Retrieved 3 February 2011. 
  6. ^ Rosemary Odgers and Steven Wardill (3 April 2009). "New LNP leader John Paul Langbroek warns dissidents". News.com.au. Retrieved 3 February 2011. 
  7. ^ a b Newman's bid for leadership. 7.30 (ABC News), 22 March 2011.
  8. ^ Knives out for Langbroek. Nine News Queensland, 17 March 2011.
  9. ^ LNP leader John-Paul Langbroek quits as Campbell Newman announces he will enter state politics, Courier Mail, 22 March 2011.
  10. ^ Campbell Newman's Queensland coup. 6PM with George Negus (Ten News), 22 March 2011.
  11. ^ "Opposition Appointments to the Queensland Parliament as of 11 April 2011". Retrieved 21 March 2012. 
  12. ^ "LNP leader John-Paul Langbroek keen to bite on Labor". Brisbanetimes.com.au. 2 April 2009. Retrieved 3 February 2011. 

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Cameron Dick
Minister for Education of Queensland
2012–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Stirling Hinchliffe
as Minister for Employment and Skills
Minister for Training and Employment of Queensland
2012–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Lawrence Springborg
Leader of the Opposition of Queensland
2009–2011
Succeeded by
Jeff Seeney
Parliament of Queensland
Preceded by
Lex Bell
Member for Surfers Paradise
2004–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Lawrence Springborg
Leader of the Liberal National Party of Queensland
2009–2011
Succeeded by
Campbell Newman