John Ardagh

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John Ardagh (28 May 1928, Nyasaland - 26 January 2008) was a British journalist, writer and broadcaster. He was educated at Sherborne School and Worcester College, Oxford, where he took an honors degree in classics and philosophy. In the 1950s and 1960s, he worked as a staff writer and correspondent for The Times and The Observer.[1] His book The New French Revolution, first published in 1968, has been updated many times, most recently as France in the New Century: Portrait of a Changing Society (1999). He also wrote anatomies of contemporary Ireland and Germany and co-authored and edited several travel guides. His father Osmond Ardagh played first-class cricket for Oxford University and was a colonial administrator. His son is the author and speaker Arjuna Ardagh.

Books authored[edit]

  • Ardagh, John (1999). France in the New Century: Portrait of a Changing Society. Viking. ISBN 0670883603.  (and previous editions)
  • Ardagh, John (1995). Germany and the Germans: The United Germany in the Mid-1990s. Penguin. ISBN 0140252665.  (and previous editions)
  • Ardagh, John (1995). Ireland and the Irish: Portrait of a Changing Society. Penguin. ISBN 0140171606. 
  • Ardagh, John (1979). Tale of Five Cities: Life in Provincial Europe Today (Stuttgart, Bologna, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Toulouse, Ljubljana). Secker & Warburg. ISBN 0436017482. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Ardagh, Tale of Five Cities: Life in Provincial Europe Today, London: Secker & Warburg, 1979, back flap.

External links[edit]