John Beckwith (footballer)

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John Beckwith
Personal information
Full name John Beckwith
Date of birth (1932-09-16) 16 September 1932 (age 82)
Original team Black Rock[1]
Height/Weight 180cm / 76kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1951–1960 Melbourne 176 (19)
Coaching career3
Years Club Games (W–L–D)
1968–1970 Melbourne 62 (17–45–0)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1960 season.
3 Coaching statistics correct as of 1970.
Career highlights

John Beckwith (born 16 September 1932) is a former Australian rules football player and coach, for the Melbourne Football Club in the Victorian Football League (VFL).

Beckwith's father, Wally Beckwith, was a VFL player for Fitzroy[2] and was also a VFL umpire.

Beckwith made his debut in round one against Essendon at Windy Hill. Essendon had been premiers the previous year and as such it was the unfurling of the 1950 premiership flag. The players had to line up, and General Sir Dallas Brooks, the Governor of Victoria, came past. Beckwith was only 19 years of age, and meeting the governor as well as playing his first game of VFL football was a nerve wracking experience, although he did end up kicking a goal.[2]

Beckwith was a member of Melbourne premiership sides in 1955–1957 and 1959–1960. He won a club best and fairest award in 1957, and captained the Demons from 1957 to 1959.

Beckwith spent five years as captain-coach of Colac Football Club in the Hampden Football League from 1961–1965. Under his guildance Colac won two premierships and were runners up twice.

Beckwith was an assistant coach at Melbourne in 1966. He coached Melbourne from 1967 to 1970 for 19 wins and 46 losses.

He was named in the back pocket in Melbourne 'Team of the Century'.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holmesby, Russell & Main, Jim (2007). The Encyclopedia Of AFL Footballers. BAS Publishing. ISBN 9781920910785. 
  2. ^ a b Pearce, Linda (16 March 2003). "Remembering their first time". The Age. Retrieved 26 January 2011. 

External links[edit]