John Bowe (author)

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John Bowe (born 1964 in Minnesota) is the author and editor of three books: Us: Americans Talk About Love; Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy; and Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs. He is a contributing writer for the New York Times. He has also written for The New Yorker, The American Prospect, GQ, McSweeney’s and This American Life. He co-wrote the screenplay for the film Basquiat with Julian Schnabel.

He graduated from Minneapolis' Blake School in 1982, obtained an honors BA in English from the University of Minnesota in 1987 and earned an MFA in film from the Columbia University School of the Arts in 1996.

Bowe appeared on The Daily Show on September 24, 2007 to talk about his book Nobodies, which examines slavery in modern America.

Us: Americans Talk About Love[edit]

Us: Americans Talk About Love is a selection of oral histories about love. John Bowe collaborated with a team of interviewers and co-editors to record and collect the love stories of a diverse range of U.S citizens.

Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy[edit]

Nobodies: Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the New Global Economy is an examination of modern slavery in the United States, focusing particularly upon the widening gap between rich and poor, both in the US and globally, and what this means for notions of freedom in an era of “free trade”.

Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs[edit]

Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs is an oral history based on Studs Terkel’s WORKING, offering a collection of 126 interviews from rich to poor, giving voice to the American labor force.

Awards[edit]

John Bowe is a recipient of the J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award; the Sydney Hillman Award for journalists, writers, and public figures who pursue social justice and public policy for the common good; the Richard J. Margolis Award, dedicated to journalism that combines social concern and humor; and the Harry Chapin Media Award for reportage of hunger- and poverty-related issues.

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