John Brockett (American colonist)

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John Brockett (May 20, 1611 - March 12, 1690) born in Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire, England.[1] John Brockett was almost certainly the disinherited first son of Sir John Brocket of Brocket Hall in Hertfordshire, England. John fell in love with a maiden, Mary Blackwell (1609–1662), who was also a Puritan. He was Gen Assembly Representative, Indian and government dispute settler.[2]

History[edit]

1630s[edit]

He came to America in 1637 and when he was well established there, returned to England to marry her and bring her back with him. Because of this choice, however, his father not only denied him his entire inheritance, but also had his name removed from all family records. The evidence connecting father and son is not concrete, but, according to genealogist Edward Brockett, "there can be little doubt that he was the son of Sir John Brockett." He emigrated on 26 Jun 1637 to Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony.[1][3] John Brockett was the first Brockett in America when he arrived at Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony. He came on the ship "Hector" with Reverend John Davenport (Puritan). The passengers on board that ship were "gentlemen in wealth and character, with their servants and household effects." Most were from London and engaged as merchants and commercial businesses. Their arrival was joyously hailed at Boston for they were the wealthiest of immigrants to New England at that time. Shortly arriving, however, a small group led by Theophilus Eaton decided not to join Massachusetts Bay Colony, but to form a new colony. They explored the coast along Long Island Sound and chose a site that became New Haven Colony. Seven individuals wintered there to hold the site. Others arrived on 13 April 1638, including Davenport and John Brockett. They purchased land from the Quinipiac Indians and formed a government based upon strict religious principles. He moved on 13 Apr 1638 to New Haven Colony.[4] Brockett was a signer of the first covenant of New Haven and became a leader among the founders of New Haven. His name appears more often on early town records than anyone but Eaton. In 1639, Brockett surveyed an area that is now the center of New Haven and laid out the borders with such accuracy that the same borders are used to this day.

1640s[edit]

By 1640 a complete government had been established and the settlement, originally called Quinnipiac, was renamed New Haven. The town plan was based on a grid of nine squares. In accordance with old English custom, the central square, now the Green, was designated a public common. A copy of the 1641 Brockett map as shown in "Three Centuries of New Haven, 1638-1938" by Rollin G. Osterweis, published in 1953 by Yale Univ. Press.

By 1641 New Haven had grown into a community of approximately 800. The survey map of 1641 was laid out by John Brockett. These prosperous immigrants formed a new government of a town they called New Haven. The residents must have had confidence in Brockett's judgment as he was often appointed by the Planters to a committee to resolve cases of differing opinion regarding settlers and Indians.

John Brockett was involved in the military over quite a long period. In 1643, he was fined a shilling for coming late to military training.

1650s[edit]

In 1654, John Brockett was appointed surgeon among a group of soldiers who had aligned themselves against the Dutch who settled along the Hudson River.

1660s[edit]

In 1660, he led an effort to resolve a border dispute between Connecticut Colony (in Hartford) and New Haven Colony. He moved in 1667 to Elizabethtown, Union, NJ.[3] He moved in 1669 to Wallingford, New Haven Colony.[5]

In 1667, 28 years later, Brockett was commissioned by the Governor of New Jersey to survey the bounds of Elizabethtown, which has since become the City of Elizabeth, NJ. This effort required him to temporary reside in that city. Brockett received an allotment of land for his efforts that he sold when he left Elizabethtown in 1670. While living in Elizabethtown, the townspeople chose him and John Ogden were chosen to represent Elizabethtown in its House of Burgess.

In 1669, the Colony of New Haven began planning Wallingford village. The area was infested with thousands of wolves that killed cattle and sheep. John Brockett and his son Samuel were among the first 100 persons to settle there. Each of the 38 settlers were allotted land. Brockett received lot #1 of 12 acres (49,000 m2) and his son John received 8 acres (32,000 m2).John was elected to public offices and became one of the leading men of the town. He eventually represented Wallingford in the General Assembly.

1670s[edit]

He was Deputy to the General Court between 1671 and 1685 in Wallingford, New Haven Colony.[6] He served several nonconsecutive terms during this period. He served as a surgeon between 1675 and 1676 in King Philip's War (1675–1676).[7] In Jun 1675 an 1676, Brockett was again surgeon during the King Philip's War in which 600 colonialists were killed at a cost of over $1,000,000.

1690s[edit]

He signed a will on 3 Mar 1690 in Wallingford, New Haven, CT.[8][9] He died on 12 Mar 1690 in Windsor, Hartford, CT. and is buried in the Center Street Cemetery, Wallingford.[8][10][11] He was a surveyor, civil engineer, surgeon.[2][12]

Parents: Father, Sir John Brockett, Knight (1581–1649); Mother, Mary BANNISTER.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905. Page 23.
  2. ^ a b William Frederick Doolittle. The Doolittle Family in America (Part I). Cleveland, OH: National Printing Company, 1901. Page 61.
  3. ^ a b Meredith B. Colket, Jr.. Founders of Early American Families. Emigrants from Europe 1607-1657. Cleveland, OH: The General Court of the Order of the Founders and Patriots of America, 1975. Page 46.
  4. ^ Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905. Page 23.
  5. ^ Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905.
  6. ^ Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905. Page 27.
  7. ^ Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905. Pages 29-30.
  8. ^ a b James Savage. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England Showing Three Generations of Those Who Came Before May, 1692, of the Basis of Farmer's Register, Volume I. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1965. Page 258.
  9. ^ Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905. Page 29.
  10. ^ Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905. Page 24.
  11. ^ Donald Lines Jacobus. Families of Ancient New Haven, Volume I-III. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, Reprint Page 323.
  12. ^ Edward Brockett. The Descendants of John Brockett; One of the Original Founders of New Haven Colony. East Orange, NJ. 1905. Page 26.

Additional reading[edit]

External links[edit]