John Brown Farm and Gravesite

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John Brown Farm and Gravesite
John Brown's grave - 1896 S R Stoddard.jpg
John Brown's grave, 1896, S R Stoddard.
John Brown Farm and Gravesite is located in New York
John Brown Farm and Gravesite
Nearest city Lake Placid, New York
Coordinates 44°15′08″N 73°58′18″W / 44.252240°N 73.971799°W / 44.252240; -73.971799Coordinates: 44°15′08″N 73°58′18″W / 44.252240°N 73.971799°W / 44.252240; -73.971799
Built 1849
Governing body New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
NRHP Reference # 72000840
Significant dates
Added to NRHP June 19, 1972[1]
Designated NHL August 6, 1998[2]

The John Brown Farm and Gravesite was the home and is the final resting place of abolitionist John Brown. It is located on John Brown Road in North Elba near Lake Placid, New York, where John Brown moved in 1849 to lead freed slaves in farming. In 1855, he moved to Kansas to support his sons' efforts to keep Kansas as a free-state under the popular sovereignty laws, leaving his wife and several of his children behind. Brown returned to visit his family at Lake Placid several times. In 1859, Brown attempted to start a liberation movement among enslaved African Americans by seizing the arsenal at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. For this, he was tried for treason against the state of Virginia and was hanged.

The entire property purchased by John Brown and two sons in 1849 is preserved intact. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1998.[2][3]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. 
  2. ^ a b "John Brown Farm and Gravesite". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. September 11, 2007. 
  3. ^ Gobrecht, Lawrence E. (November 21, 1997). National Historic Landmark Nomination: John Brown Farm and Gravesite PDF (341 KB). National Park Service.  and Accompanying 9 photos, exterior, from 1996. PDF (1.59 MB)

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