John C. McAdams

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John C. McAdams (born October 26, 1945)[1] is an associate professor of political science at Marquette University. McAdams teaches courses on American politics and public policy and the John F. Kennedy assassination; he runs a website on the assassination and has published a book the subject, JFK Assassination Logic: How to Think about Claims of Conspiracy (2011).[2] He describes himself as "a debunker by temperament".[3]

Background[edit]

McAdams attended Kennedy High School in Kennedy, Alabama.[4] He gained an undergraduate degree from the University of Alabama and a masters from the Teachers College, Columbia University.[3] He earned his PhD from Harvard University in 1981.[2]

Career[edit]

McAdams teaches courses on American politics and public policy and the John F. Kennedy assassination and has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Sociological Quarterly, and Law and Contemporary Problems.[2]

McAdams has been described as a "JFK Assassination Expert".[5] He maintains The Kennedy Assassination Home Page, a web page of articles, resources, and links devoted to debunking various conspiracies regarding the assassination. The site has been called "impressively comprehensive",[6] "the best gateway to serious and reliable materials"[7] and "the best collection of Kennedy assassination-related information."[8] He is also co-moderator of the Usenet group alt.assassination.jfk. He is the author of the book JFK Assassination Logic: How to Think about Claims of Conspiracy (2011).[9]

Politics[edit]

McAdams has been described as a "vocal conservative"[10] and is a proponent of capital punishment.[11] In 2006, he testified before the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights Subcommittee of the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary as an expert on capital punishment.[12]

McAdams runs the blog Marquette Warrior.[13]

Books[edit]

  • JFK Assassination Logic: How to Think about Claims of Conspiracy, Potomac Books, 2011

References[edit]

  1. ^ Library of Congress. "McAdams, John, 1945-". http://id.loc.gov. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "John C. McAdams | Department of Political Science | Marquette University". Marquette.edu. Retrieved October 16, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b John C. McAdams, JFK Assassination Logic: How to Think about Claims of Conspiracy, Potomac Books, 2011. p307
  4. ^ Parks, Dan (December 31, 1993). "Students view 'JFK' in lesson on evidence; New MU class examines data". Milwaukee Sentinel (Milwaukee). p. 6A. Retrieved January 15, 2013. 
  5. ^ Krajicek, David. "JFK Assassination". truTV.com. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. p. 1. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  6. ^ Web of Conspiracy: A Guide to Conspiracy Theory Sites on the Internet By James F. Broderick, Darren W. Miller, Information Today, Inc., 2008
  7. ^ The history highway 3.0: a guide to internet resources By Dennis A. Trinkle, Scott A. Merriman, M.E. Sharpe, 2002
  8. ^ Great American Websites: an online discovery of a hidden America By Edward J. Renehan, Osborne McGraw-Hill, 1997
  9. ^ McAdams, John (2011). JFK Assassination Logic: How to Think about Claims of Conspiracy. Washington, D.C.: Potomac Books, Inc. ISBN 1-59797-489-7. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  10. ^ Twohey, Megan (March 9, 2006). "Marquette bans feminist play University calls it too distracting; critics say move limits free speech". Milwaukee Sentinel (Milwaukee). p. 1B, 2B. Retrieved January 15, 2013. 
  11. ^ Wilson, Chris (June 12, 2007). "Mixed Views on the Death Penalty". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved January 15, 2013. 
  12. ^ S. Hrg. 109-540 - AN EXAMINATION OF THE DEATH PENALTY IN THE UNITED STATES. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. February 1, 2006. p. 14. 
  13. ^ Barbaro, Michael (March 7, 2006). "Wal-Mart Enlists Bloggers in P.R. Campaign". The New York Times (New York). Retrieved January 15, 2013. 

External links[edit]