John Campbell (rugby)

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John Campbell
Full name John Dennison Campbell[1]
Date of birth (1889-07-22)22 July 1889[1]
Place of birth Penrith, New South Wales [1]
Date of death 30 August 1966(1966-08-30) (aged 77)[1]
Place of death Harbord, New South Wales
Professional clubs
Years Club / team Caps (points)
1910-12, 1921
1912-?
Easts
Leeds

258

414
Rugby union career
Playing career
Position centre[1]
National team(s)
Years Club / team Caps (points)
1910[1] Wallabies[1] 3[1] (0)[1]

John Dennison 'Dinny' Campbell (22 July 1889 – 30 August 1966) was a national representative for Australia in rugby union before switching codes and playing rugby league for the Eastern Suburbs club during the 1910-12 and 1921 seasons.

Rugby & Rugby league career[edit]

Campbell was born in Penrith, New South Wales. He played in the centre position in rugby union, claiming a total of 3 international rugby caps for Australia.

He switched to the professional code of rugby league football, playing for Eastern Suburbs.[2] He played centre, or five-eight for Eastern Suburbs. Campbell played alongside Dally Messenger in Easts first premiership winning sides. He was also a representative of New South Wales (NSW) in matches against Queensland and New Zealand in the 1911 and '12 seasons. He returned and played one last season with Easts in 1921.

English career[edit]

At the end of the 1912 season he moved to England, where he enjoyed 9 very successful seasons - scoring 136 tries. In 1921 Campbell returned to Australia, where he linked with his former club, Eastern Suburbs, for one final season. Campbell later went on to become a talent scout for the Eastern suburbs. Campbell made his début for Leeds against Keighley at Headingley Stadium on Saturday 14 September 1912.[3] Campbell played Centre, i.e. number 4 in Leeds' 2-35 defeat to Huddersfield in the 1914-15 Rugby Football League Championship final.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Scrum.com player profile of Dinny Campbell". Scrum.com. Retrieved 12 July 2010. 
  2. ^ Cunneen, Chris (2001). The best ever Australian Sports Writing. Australia: Black Inc. p. 322. ISBN 1-86395-266-7. Retrieved 19 February 2011. 
  3. ^ Dalby, Ken (1955). The Headingley Story - 1890-1955 - Volume One - Rugby. The Leeds Cricket, Football & Athletic Co. Ltd ASIN: B0018JNGVM
  4. ^ "History of Leeds Rugby League Club". britishrugbyleague.blogspot.co.uk. 31 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • The Encyclopedia Of Rugby League Players; Alan Whiticker & Glen Hudson

External links[edit]