John Ching Hsiung Wu

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

John Ching Hsiung Wu[1] (also John C.H. Wu; Traditional Chinese: 吳經熊; pinyin: Wu Jingxiong) (born 1899, Ningbo – 1986) was a Chinese jurist and author. He wrote works in Chinese, English, French, and German on Christian spirituality, Chinese literature (including a translation of the Tao Te Ching) and on legal topics. A graduate of the University of Michigan Law School, he was the principal author of the constitution of the Republic of China. He was a convert to Roman Catholicism. He maintained a correspondence with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and later produced scholarly work examining Holmes' legal thought.

Works by John C. H. Wu[edit]

  • Juridical Essays and Studies (Shanghai, China: Commercial Press, 1928) (Shanghai, China: Commercial Press, 1933)
  • Some Unpublished Letters of Justice Holmes ([Shanghai, China]: s.n., 1935)
  • The Art of Law and Other Essays Juridical and Literary (Shanghai : Commercial Press, 1936)
  • Essays in Jurisprudence and Legal Philosophy ([Shanghai]: Soochow University Law School, 1938) (1981)
  • The Science of Love: A Study in the Teachings of Thérèse of Lisieux (Huntington, Indiana: Our Sunday Visitor Press, 1941)(Hong Kong: Catholic Truth Society, 1941)
  • Justice Holmes to Doctor Wu: An Intimate Correspondence 1921-1932 (New York: Central Book Co., 1947)
  • From Confucianism to Catholicism (Huntingdon, Indiana: Our Sunday Visitor Press, 1949)
  • Beyond East and West (New York: Sheed and Ward, 1951) (Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, 1951) (New York: Sheed and Ward, 1952) (Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, 1969) (Beijing: She hui ke xue wen xian chu ban she, 2002)
  • The Interior Carmel: The Threefold Way of Love (London: Sheed & Ward, 1954) (Taipei, Taiwan: Hwakang Bookstore, 1975)
  • Fountain of Justice: A Study in Natural Law (New York; Sheed and Ward, 1955)(London: Sheed and Ward, 1959)(Taipei: Mei Ya Publications, 1971)
  • Justice Holmes: A New Estimate (Philadelphia: Brandeis Lawyers Society, 1957)
  • Cases and Materials on Jurisprudence (St. Paul, Minnesota: West Publishing Co., 1958)
  • Chinese Humanism and Christian spirituality (Jamaica, New York: St. John's University Press, 1965)
  • Sun Yat-sen: The Man and His Ideas (Taipei: Published for Sun Yat-sen Cultural Foundation by the Commercial Press, 1971)
  • The Four Seasons of T`ang Poetry (Rutland, Vermont: C.E. Tuttle Co., 1972) ISBN 978-0-8048-0197-3
  • Zhongguo zhe hsuëh [Chinese philosophy] (Taipei, Taiwan: China Academy, 1974)
  • The Golden Age of Zen (Taipei, Taiwan: United Publishing Center, 1975) (Taipei: Hua kang ch`u pan yu hsien kung ssu / tsung ching hsiao Hua kang shu ch`eng, 1975) (New York: Doubleday, 1996. ISBN 978-0-385-47993-6)
  • Tao Teh Ching (translation) (New York: St. John's University Press, 1961) [Dao teh jing (New York: Barnes & Noble, 1997)] (Boston: Shambhala, 2003)
  • "Chinese Legal and political Philosophy," [pp. 213–237] in The Chinese Mind: Essentials of Chinese Philosophy and Culture, ed. Charles A. Moore (Honolulu: East-West Center Press, 1967)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Sometimes erroneously written as John Chin Hsung Wu

External links[edit]