John Clifford Wallace

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John Wallace
Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
In office
January 31, 1991 – April 8, 1996
Preceded by Alfred Goodwin
Succeeded by Procter Hug
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
In office
June 28, 1972 – April 8, 1996
Appointed by Richard Nixon
Preceded by James Carter
Succeeded by Kim Wardlaw
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of California
In office
October 16, 1970 – June 28, 1972
Appointed by Richard Nixon
Preceded by Seat established
Succeeded by William Enright
Personal details
Born (1928-12-11) December 11, 1928 (age 85)
San Diego, California, U.S.
Alma mater San Diego State University
University of California, Berkeley

John Clifford Wallace (born December 11, 1928) is a United States federal judge.

Born in San Diego, California,[1] Wallace received a B.A. from San Diego State University in 1952, and an LL.B. from University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law in 1955. He served in the United States Navy as a Second Class Petty Officer from 1946 to 1949. He was in private practice in San Diego from 1955 to 1970, at the law firm of Gray Carey Ames & Frye.

Wallace served as a federal trial-court judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of California, having been nominated by President Richard Nixon on October 7, 1970, to a new seat created by 84 Stat. 294. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on October 13, 1970, and received his commission on October 16, 1970.

Wallace was subsequently nominated to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit by President Nixon on May 22, 1972, to a seat vacated by the Honorable James Marshall Carter. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 28, 1972, and received his commission the same day. Wallace served as Chief Judge of the Ninth Circuit from 1991 to 1996. He assumed senior status on April 8, 1996. As a senior judge, Wallace has a reduced caseload, but he continues to hear cases in the Ninth Circuit, and he sits by designation from time to time as a visiting judge on other federal appellate courts.

Throughout his career as an appellate judge, Wallace has been deeply interested in developing strong judicial systems around the world. Judge Wallace's support for the "rule of law" movement, which seeks to impart the concepts and ideals of an independent judiciary and impartial judicial system, dates to 1972, when he began using personal vacation time to visit judiciaries overseas. After taking senior status, he began to spend about half his time on the effort. In all, he has worked directly with judiciaries in more than 50 countries and on every continent. Judge Wallace also serves on the Asia Council of the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative.

The American Judicature Society honored Wallace with its 24th Annual Edward J. Devitt Distinguished Service to Justice Award. The award is one recognizing "significant contributions to the administration of justice, the advancement of the rule of law, and the improvement of society as a whole", and was formally presented to Judge Wallace by U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy in ceremonies at San Diego's Spreckles Theater on October 19, 2006.

A devout Mormon, Judge Wallace has been active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, serving in local and regional governing posts. Judge Wallace also has long supported the Boy Scouts of America, serving on the local chapter's board of directors and executive committee from 1977 to 1993.

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ [1]
Sources
Legal offices
New seat Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of California
1970–1972
Succeeded by
William Enright
Preceded by
James Carter
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
1972–1996
Succeeded by
Kim Wardlaw
Preceded by
Alfred Goodwin
Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
1991–1996
Succeeded by
Procter Hug