John Coburn House

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John Coburn House
John Coburn House.png
John Coburn House is located in Boston
John Coburn House
General information
Location Beacon Hill
Address Private residence: 2 Phillips Street
Town or city Boston
Country United States
Coordinates 42°21′37″N 71°03′59″W / 42.360337°N 71.066381°W / 42.360337; -71.066381

The John Coburn House was the home of John Coburn, an African American abolitionist, soldier and recruiter, and aided people on the Underground Railroad. The home is currently a private residence. It is on the Black Heritage Trail and its history is included in walking tours by the Boston African American National Historic Site.

John Coburn[edit]

John Coburn (1811–1873) was a clothing retailer and community activist. He served as treasurer of the New England Freedom Association, an organization dedicated to helping people escape from slavery. In 1851 he was arrested, tried, and acquitted for the court-house rescue of Shadrach Minkins, a freedom seeker who was caught in Boston by federal slave catchers empowered by the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Coburn was co-founder and captain of the Massasoit Guards, a black military company in 1850s Boston that was a precursor to the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry.[1]

Black Heritage Trail[edit]

The house is a Boston African American historical site located on the Black Heritage Trail ® in Beacon Hill.[1][2][3][4]

The National Park Services wrote:

The historic buildings along today's Black Heritage Trail® were the homes, businesses, schools and churches of a thriving black community that organized, from the nation's earliest years, to sustain those who faced local discrimination and national slavery, struggling toward the equality and freedom promised in America's documents of national liberty.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Boston African American NHS Park Brochure, Side 2". National Park Service. Retrieved April 26, 2013.   This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Park Service.
  2. ^ Fodor's (16 December 2008). The Official Guide to America's National Parks, 13th Edition. Fodor's Travel Publications. pp. 441–. ISBN 978-1-4000-1628-0. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  3. ^ David L. Scott; Kay W. Scott. Guide to the National Park Areas, Eastern States. Globe Pequot. pp. 110–112. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Boston African American NHS Park Brochure, Side 1". National Park Service. Retrieved April 26, 2013.   This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the National Park Service.

External links[edit]