John Coltrane House

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This article is about the John Coltrane House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. For the John Coltrane Home in Dix Hills, New York, see John Coltrane Home.
John Coltrane House
ColtraneH.jpg
John Coltrane House is located in Pennsylvania
John Coltrane House
Location 1511 North 33rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 39°58′49.15″N 75°11′20.9″W / 39.9803194°N 75.189139°W / 39.9803194; -75.189139Coordinates: 39°58′49.15″N 75°11′20.9″W / 39.9803194°N 75.189139°W / 39.9803194; -75.189139
Architect E. Allen Wilson
Architectural style Colonial Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 99000628
Significant dates
Added to NRHP January 20, 1999[1]
Designated NHL January 20, 1999[2]
The John Coltrane House in 2009

John Coltrane House was the home of saxophonist and jazz pioneer John Coltrane from 1952 until 1958.[2]

Coltrane purchased the house for his family after leaving the army and lived there until he relocated to New York City in 1958.[3] He continued to use the house as an alternate residence to his New York home until the end of his life. On his death in 1967 the house passed to his cousin, Cousin Mary (namesake of a song on the album Giant Steps). [4]

The "John W. Coltrane Cultural Society" was founded in 1984 and establishing a John W. Coltrane Center at 1509 N. 33rd Street.[5][6]

The house was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1999.[2][7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. 
  2. ^ a b c "John Coltrane House". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-02-16. 
  3. ^ Fitzgerald, Sharon (1 June 1999). "A Giant Step". American Visions  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 22 August 2014. 
  4. ^ http://loc.gov/pictures/item/pa3863/
  5. ^ Milloy, Courtland (4 June 1991). "Remembering a Favorite Musical Son". Washington Post  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 22 August 2014. 
  6. ^ Lane, Lynda (28 July 1995). "THE JOHN W. COLTRANE SOCIETY celebrates 10 years of living the legacy". Philadelphia Tribune  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 22 August 2014. 
  7. ^ Michael J. Lewis (July 5, 1998). National Historic Landmark: John Coltrane House PDF (32 KB). National Park Service.  and Accompanying 3 photos, exterior and interior, from 1996 PDF (32 KB)
  8. ^ Roberts, Kimberly (11 February 2003). "Coltrane Cultural Society preserving a musical legacy". Philadelphia Tribune  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 22 August 2014. 

External links[edit]