John Curtis Chamberlain

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For other people named John Chamberlain, see John Chamberlain (disambiguation).
John Curtis Chamberlain
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1818–1819
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-large district
In office
March 4, 1809 – March 3, 1811
Preceded by Daniel Meserve Durell
Succeeded by Samuel Dinsmoor
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1802–1804
Personal details
Born (1772-06-05)June 5, 1772
Worcester, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA
Died (1834-12-08) December 8, 1834 (age 179)
Utica, Oneida County, New York, USA
Resting place Mt. Albion Cemetery, Albion, Orleans County, New York, USA
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s) Nancy Hubbard Chamberlain
Children Mary Chamberlain
Nancy Hubbard Chamberlain
John Chamberlain
Hubbard Chamberlain
William Chamberlain
Elizabeth Jane Chamberlain
Richard Hubbard Chamberlain
Harriett Prudence Chamberlain
George Chamberlain
Parents John Chamberlain
Mary Curtis Chamberlain
Alma mater Harvard University

John Curtis Chamberlain (June 5, 1772 – December 8, 1834) was an American attorney and Federalist politician in the U.S. state of New Hampshire who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives and as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives.

Early life[edit]

Chamberlain was born in Worcester, Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard University in 1793.[1] He read law, being superintended by Benjamin West of Charleston. He was admitted to the bar in 1796 and began practicing law in Alstead, New Hampshire.[2]

Career[edit]

Chamberlain wrote a series of essays as The Hermit which appeared for a year or more in "The Farmer's Museum" beginning in the summer of 1796. He also was ghost writer for Mrs. Susanna Willard Johnson's "A Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Johnson" in 1796.[3] He was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1802–1804. In 1804, he moved to Charlestown, New Hampshire becoming partners with Benjamin West until West's death in 1817.[4]

Elected as a Federalist to the Eleventh Congress, Chamberlain served as United States Representative for the state of New Hampshire from March 4, 1809 to March 3, 1811.[5] After leaving Congress he resumed the practice of aw. He served as a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives again in 1818. He continued his practice until he moved in 1826d to Utica, New York.

Death[edit]

Chamberlain died in Utica, Oneida County, New York on December 8, 1834 (age 62 years, 186 days). He is interred at Mt. Albion Cemetery, Albion, Orleans County, New York.

Family life[edit]

Son of John and Mary Curtis Chamberlain,[6] he married Nancy Hubbard on December 29, l797; and they had nine children, Mary, Nancy Hubbard, John, Hubbard, William, Elizabeth Jane, Richard Hubbard, Harriett Prudence, and George.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harvard University (1900). Quinquennial Catalogue of the Officers and Graduates of Harvard University. The University. p. 164. 
  2. ^ Lincoln, William (1862). History of Worcester, Massachusetts: From Its Earliest Settlement to September 1836 : with Various Notices Relating to the History of Worcester County. Hersey,. p. 226. 
  3. ^ Ellis, Milton. Joseph Dennie and His Circle: A Study in American Literature from 1792-1812, Issue 3. The University, 1915 - American literature. p. 96. Retrieved 21 July 2014. 
  4. ^ Bell, Charles Henry. The bench and bar of New Hampshire: including biographical notices of deceased judges of the highest court, and lawyers of the province and state, and a list of names of those now living. Houghton, Mifflin and company, 1893 - Biography & Autobiography. p. 245. Retrieved 21 July 2014. 
  5. ^ Saunderson, Henry Hamilton (1876). History of Charlestown, New Hampshire: The Old No. 4, Embracing the Part Borne by Its Inhabitants in the Indian, French and Revolutionary Wars, and the Vermont Controversy; Also Genealogies and Sketches of Families, from Its Settlement to 1876. Claremont Manufacturing Company. p. 300. 
  6. ^ Saunderson, Henry Hamilton. History of Charlestown, New Hampshire: The Old No. 4, Embracing the Part Borne by Its Inhabitants in the Indian, French and Revolutionary Wars, and the Vermont Controversy; Also Genealogies and Sketches of Families, from Its Settlement to 1876. Claremont Manufacturing Company, 1876 - Charlestown (N.H. : Town). p. 298. Retrieved 21 July 2014. 
  7. ^ "John Curtis Chamberlain". Genealogy Trails. Retrieved 21 July 2014. 

External links[edit]


New Hampshire House of Representatives
Preceded by
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
1818-1819
Succeeded by
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Daniel Meserve Durell
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire

1818-1819
Succeeded by
Samuel Dinsmoor
New Hampshire House of Representatives
Preceded by
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
1802–1804
Succeeded by