John Dall

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John Dall
John Dall in Rope trailer.jpg
from the Rope film trailer, 1948
Born John Jenner Thompson
(1918-05-26)May 26, 1918
New York City, New York, U.S.
Died January 15, 1971(1971-01-15) (aged 52)
Hollywood, California, U.S.
Years active 1945-1965

John Dall (May 26, 1918 – January 15, 1971) [1] was an American actor.

Life and career[edit]

Dall was born John Jenner Thompson in New York City, New York, the second son of Charles Jenner Thompson, a civil engineer, and his wife Henry (née Worthington).[2]

Primarily a stage actor, he is best remembered today for two film roles: the cool-minded intellectual killer in Alfred Hitchcock's film Rope, and the trigger-happy lead in the 1950 noir Gun Crazy. He also had a substantial role in Stanley Kubrick's film Spartacus.

He first came to fame as the young prodigy who comes alive under the tutelage of Bette Davis in The Corn Is Green, for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Warner Bros signed him to a contract to make the film but they let him go in 1946.[3]

In 1962 Dall made two guest appearances on Perry Mason: "The Case of the Lonely Eloper", and the murder victim in "The Case of the Weary Watchdog." In 1963 he again portrayed the murder victim in "The Case of the Reluctant Model." He made his fourth and final appearance on the show in the 1965 episode, "The Case of the Laughing Lady."

Dall died in Hollywood, California. Sources indicate he died of a heart attack.[4]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "John Dall - Biography". Internet Movie Database (IMDb). IMDb.com, Inc. Retrieved 2013-08-12. 
  2. ^ Burroughs Hannsberry, Karen (2003). Bad boys: the actors of film noir. McFarland. p. 176. ISBN 0786414847. 
  3. ^ PARAMOUNT BUYS HARVESTING STORY: Studio Will Produce Houston Branch's 'The Big Haircut' --Lead to Alan Ladd Special to THE NEW YORK TIMES.. New York Times (1923-Current file) [New York, N.Y] 11 May 1946: 34.
  4. ^ Obituary New York Times, January 18, 1971.

External links[edit]