John Doukas Komnenos

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John Doukas Komnenos (1128-September 1176) was a son of Andronikos Komnenos.[1] Through his father, he was a grandson of Byzantine Emperor John II Komnenos. He was doux (military governor) of Cyprus from 1155 until his death as well as being appointed a protovestiarios in 1148.

Life[edit]

John Doukas was named doux of Cyprus in 1155, the post he held until his death. In 1156, Cyprus was attacked by Raynald of Châtillon and Thoros II, Prince of Armenia; Thoros and Raynald both conducted widespread plundering of the island:[2] the Franks and Armenians marched up and down the island robbing and pillaging every building that they saw, churches and convents as well as shops and private houses.[3] The crops were burnt; the herds were rounded up, together with all the population, and driven down to the coast.[4] John opposed the attack but was captured by Raynald and Thoros and was taken prisoner to Antioch.[5]

The nightmare lasted about three weeks; then, on the rumour of an imperial fleet in the offing, Raynald gave the order for re-embarkation.[6] The ships were loaded up with booty; and every Cypriot was forced to ransom himself.[7]

John was presumably released from captivity in Antioch, as he took part in the Battle of Myriokephalon under Manuel I Komnenos. The Byzantines were defeated and John Doukas died during the battle, shortly after 17 September 1176.[8]

Marriage and children[edit]

John Doukas was married around 1146 to a woman later known as Maria, a Taronitissa,[9] possibly daughter of John Taronites, pansebastos sebastos. The couple had at least two children:

  1. Maria (c.1154-1208/1217), married firstly to Amalric I of Jerusalem; from this marriage she had a daughter, the future Isabella I of Jerusalem and then married secondly to Balian of Ibelin, amongst the children produced from this marriage was John of Ibelin, the Old Lord of Beirut
  2. Alexios Komnenos (died 1187), led a rebellion against Andronikos I Komnenos but was captured, blinded and imprisoned,[10] died unmarried

References[edit]

  1. ^ Niketas Choniates, Liber III Rerum a Manuele Comneno Gestarum, 2, p. 135.
  2. ^ Runciman, Steven. A History of the Crusades – Volume II.: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East: 1100–1187.
  3. ^ Charles Cawley (2009-04-01). "Lords of the Mountains, Kings of (Cilician) Armenia (Family of Rupen)".
  4. ^ A History of Armenia
  5. ^ Runciman (1978), Vol. 2, pp. 347-8.
  6. ^ Runciman, Steven. A History of the Crusades – Volume II.: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East: 1100–1187.
  7. ^ Runciman, Steven. A History of the Crusades – Volume II.: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East: 1100–1187.
  8. ^ Cawley, Charles, BYZANTIUM, Medieval Lands, Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, retrieved August 2012 ,[better source needed]
  9. ^ Rüdt-Collenberg (1975), p. 125, footnote 30.
  10. ^ Niketas Choniates, Imperiii Andronici Comneni, Liber 1, 8, p. 384.