John G. Richardson

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John G. Richardson
John G. Richardson.jpg
Commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development
In office
January 2007 – November 2009
Preceded by Jack Cashman
Succeeded by Thaxter Trafton
97th Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives
In office
December 2004 – December 2006
Preceded by Patrick Colwell
Succeeded by Glenn Cummings
Maine House Majority Leader
In office
December 2002 – December 2004
Preceded by Patrick Colwell
Succeeded by Glenn Cummings
Member of the Maine House of Representatives
from the 49th & 63rd district
In office
December 1998 – December 2006
Preceded by Reginald G. Pinkham
Succeeded by Charles R. Priest
Personal details
Born June 29, 1957
Washington, DC
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Dr. Stephanie Grohs
Children John A., Glenn, Madeline
Residence Brunswick, Maine
Alma mater Creighton University School of Law, University of Maryland
Religion Roman Catholic
Website John Richardson for Maine

John G. Richardson is a Maine politician. A Democrat, Richardson sought the Democratic Nomination for Governor of Maine in 2010.[1] He formerly served as Commissioner of Economic and Community Development and the Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives.[2]

In the Legislature[edit]

In 1998, Richardson beat an incumbent Republican to win election to the Maine House of Representatives.

As a freshman on the Banking and Insurance Committee, he led the effort to enact a Patient Bill of Rights. The following term, as chair of the Business and Economic Development Committee, he sponsored and wrote the economic development bond bill that passed on the June 2002 ballot. He also led the effort to pass a $12 million affordable housing bond to stimulate affordable housing in Southern and Mid-coast Maine.

In 2002, John was elected House Majority Leader in the 121st Legislature, where he was the political spokesperson for the House Democratic caucus.

Richardson was elected the 97th Speaker of the House of Representatives in 2005. As Speaker, he successfully led efforts eliminate a $1 billion budget deficit and to balance the budget, brokered legislation to cut taxes, and reformed the Business Equipment Tax Reimbursement law to help small businesses and create jobs. He earned a reputation as a consensus builder - helping to end a long stretch of partisan budget battles with bipartisan agreement on a supplemental spending plan. But he also built and broadened his party's influence, leaving the House with a solid Democratic majority after it came within a couple votes of falling to the opposition.[3]

Committee assignments

  • Business and Economic Development (Chair)[4]
  • Banking and Insurance [5]
  • Rules and Business of the House (Ex Officio)[6][7]
Richardson at the University of Maine.

2010 gubernatorial bid[edit]

On April 26, 2010, just 6 weeks prior to the Democratic primary, Richardson ended his run for Governor. He did not qualify for Clean Elections funding after allegations that campaign workers forged many $5 checks needed to obtain public funding.[8]

Election History[edit]

Year Office Election Subject Party Votes  % Opponent Party Votes  %
1998 State Representative District 49 General[9] John Richardson Democratic 1,351 51.1 Reginald G. Pinkham Republican 1,294 48.9
2000 State Representative District 49 General[10] John Richardson Democratic 2,399 65.6 William J. Donovan Republican 1,259 34.4
2002 State Representative District 49 General[11] John Richardson Democratic 1,884 63.3 Ronald G. Dumont Republican 1,094 36.7
2004 State Representative District 63 General[12] John Richardson Democratic 2,920 61.5 Amy L. Mckenna Republican 1,827 38.5

References[edit]

  1. ^ Welcome to the Public Campaign Finance Page for the State of Maine. Web. February 4, 2010. <http://www.mainecampaignfinance.com/public/candidate_office_sought_list.asp?Type=CAN&YEAR=2010>.
  2. ^ "Maine House of Representatives: Past Leadership." Maine.gov. Web. 04 Feb. 2010. <http://www.maine.gov/legis/house/history/leaders.htm>.
  3. ^ "About John | johnrichardsonformaine.com." Proven Leadership Proven Results | johnrichardsonformaine.com. Web. 04 Feb. 2010. <http://www.johnrichardsonformaine.com/bio>.
  4. ^ "Maine House of Representatives: John Richardson." Maine.gov. Web. 05 Feb. 2010. <http://www.maine.gov/legis/house/history/120th/120bios/richjg.htm>.
  5. ^ "Maine House of Representatives: John G. Richardson." Maine.gov. Web. 05 Feb. 2010. <http://www.maine.gov/legis/house/history/119th/119bios/richjg.htm>.
  6. ^ "Maine House of Representatives: John Richardson." Maine.gov. Web. 05 Feb. 2010. <http://www.maine.gov/legis/house/history/121st/121bios/richjg.htm>.
  7. ^ "Maine House of Representatives: John Richardson." Maine.gov. Web. 05 Feb. 2010. <http://www.maine.gov/legis/house/history/122nd/122bios/richjg.htm>.
  8. ^ Miller, Kevin (April 26, 2010). "Richardson ends bid for Blaine House — Politics — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine". Bangor Daily News. Retrieved 7 May 2013. 
  9. ^ "General Election Tabulations - November 3, 1998 - State Representative (Secretary of State, State of Maine, U.S.A.)." Maine.gov. Web. 04 Feb. 2010. <http://www.state.me.us/sos/cec/elec/gen98sr.htm>.
  10. ^ "Maine General Election, November 7, 2000 - Tabulations - State Representative (Secretary of State, State of Maine, U.S.A.)." Maine.gov. Web. 04 Feb. 2010. <http://www.state.me.us/sos/cec/elec/2000g/gen00sr.htm>.
  11. ^ "General Election, November 5, 2002 - Tabulations - State Representative (Secretary of State, State of Maine, U.S.A.)." Maine.gov. Web. 05 Feb. 2010. <http://www.state.me.us/sos/cec/elec/2002g/gen02sr.htm>.
  12. ^ "General Election, November 2, 2004 - Tabulations - State Representative (Secretary of State, State of Maine, U.S.A.)." Maine.gov. Web. 05 Feb. 2010. <http://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/elec/2004n/sr.htm>.