John Graham-Cumming

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John Graham-Cumming
Image of John Graham-Cumming.jpg
Alma mater University of Oxford
Thesis The formal development of secure systems (1992)
Doctoral advisor Jeff W. Sanders
Website
www.jgc.org

John Graham-Cumming is a British programmer and writer[1] best known for having originated a successful petition to the British Government asking for an apology for its persecution of Alan Turing.[2]

Graham-Cumming is the original writer of POPFile, an open-source, cross-platform e-mail filtering program.[3] He is the author of The Geek Atlas, a travel book,[4] and GNU Make Unleashed, a how-to technical manual for the GNU make program.[5]

In October 2010, he started an organization whose aim is to build Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine [6][7][8][9] known as Plan 28[10] and has also campaigned for open-source software in science.[11] In 2014 he launched his microblog MovieCode site, the intention of which is to connect film screenshots to specific extracts of source code.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "John Graham-Cumming". The Guardian. Retrieved 2013-10-03. 
  2. ^ "Petition seeks apology for Enigma code-breaker Turing - CNN.com". Edition.cnn.com. 2009-09-01. Retrieved 2013-10-03. 
  3. ^ Schechter, Bruce (8 March 2003). "Spambusters". NewScientist. Retrieved 3 November 2013. 
  4. ^ John Graham-Cumming (2009). The Geek Atlas: 128 Places Where Science and Technology Come Alive. Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly Media, Inc. ISBN 0-596-52320-3. 
  5. ^ Graham-Cumming, John (2008). GNU Make Unleashed. 
  6. ^ Fildes, Jonathan (2010-10-14). "BBC News - Campaign builds to construct Babbage Analytical Engine". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-10-03. 
  7. ^ Graham, Duncan. "A £400,000 PC downgrade: Rebooting Babbage’s Analytical Engine (Wired UK)". Wired.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-10-03. 
  8. ^ "The Greatest Machine That Never Was: John Graham-Cumming at TEDxImperialCollege". YouTube. 2012-04-26. Retrieved 2013-10-03. 
  9. ^ "John Graham-Cumming: The greatest machine that never was | Video on". Ted.com. Retrieved 2013-10-03. 
  10. ^ "Plan 28: Building Charles Babbage's Analytical Engine". Retrieved 2012-07-24. 
  11. ^ Ince, D. C.; Hatton, L.; Graham-Cumming, J. (2012). "The case for open computer programs". Nature 482 (7386): 485–488. doi:10.1038/nature10836. PMID 22358837.  edit
  12. ^ Johnson, Phil (8 January 2014). "The sources of all that code you see in TV and movies". ITworld. Retrieved 13 January 2014. 

External links[edit]