John Hamilton, 1st Viscount Sumner

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named John Hamilton, see John Hamilton (disambiguation).
The Right Honourable

The Viscount Sumner

GCB, PC
1stViscountSumner.jpg
Contemporary photograph of Lord Sumner by Walter Thomas.
Personal details
Born 3 February 1859
Chorlton-upon-Medlock, Lancashire
Died 24 May 1934
Nationality British
Spouse(s) Maude Margaret Todd
Alma mater Balliol College, Oxford

John Andrew Hamilton, 1st Viscount Sumner, GCB, PC (3 February 1859 – 24 May 1934) was a British lawyer and judge. He was appointed a judge of the High Court of Justice (King's Bench Division) in 1909, a Lord Justice of Appeal in 1912 and a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary in 1913. Created a life peer as Baron Sumner in 1913, he was further honoured when he was granted a hereditary peerage as Viscount Sumner in 1927.

Background and education[edit]

Hamilton was born in Chorlton-upon-Medlock, Lancashire,[1] the second son of Andrew Hamilton, an iron merchant of Manchester[2] and his wife, Francis, daughter of Joseph Sumner.[3] Hamilton was educated at Manchester Grammar School and Balliol College, Oxford.[1] In 1883, he was called to the Bar, Inner Temple.[2] Hamilton was a Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford, for seven years from 1892 and was nominated an honorary fellow in 1909.[3] He received an Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Edinburgh in 1913 and by the University of Manchester in 1919.[4] One year later, Hamilton obtained also an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law by the University of Oxford.[4]

Judicial career[edit]

Hamilton joined in the Northern Circuit and became a King's Counsel in 1901.[2] He was elected a standing counsel to the Oxford University in 1906, a post he held for the next three years.[4] On his appointment as Judge of the High Court of Justice (King's Bench Division) in 1909, he was knighted and invested a bencher.[2] In 1912 he became a Lord Justice of Appeal and sworn of the Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council.[2] Already in the following year, Hamilton became a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary and created a life peer as Baron Sumner, of Ibstone, in the County of Buckingham.[5] He was further honoured, when on 31 January 1927, he was also elevated to a hereditary peerage as Viscount Sumner, of Ibstone in the County of Buckingham.[6] Hamilton retired as judge in 1930.[1]

Further career[edit]

In 1908, Hamilton was Inspector in the Swansea Education Dispute.[2] In the House of Lords, he was chairman of the Working Classes Cost of Living, the British Cellulose Enquiry and the British and Foreign Legal Procedure committees.[2] Hamilton took part at the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 as delegate of the reparations commission, for which he was appointed a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath (GCB) in the 1920 Birthday Honours.[2] In the next year, he chaired the Royal Commission on Compensation for Suffering and Damage by Enemy Action.[4]

Family and legacy[edit]

In 1892, he married Maude Margaret Todd, the second daughter of Reverend John Wood Todd.[3] Their marriage was childless, and with Hamilton's death, the viscountcy became extinct.[3] In 2009 a biography of Lord Sumner was published by Anthony Lentin.[7]

Famous judgements[edit]

  • Bowman v The Secular Society (1917)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The Open University - Lord Sumner: a 'vice-like grip of legal principles'". Retrieved 8 July 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Debrett, John (1922). Arthur G. M. Hesilrige, ed. Debrett's House of Commons and Judicial Bench. London: Dean & Son, Ltd. p. 346. 
  3. ^ a b c d Whitaker's Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage, and Companionage. London: Whitaker & Sons. 1921. p. 535. 
  4. ^ a b c d Who is Who 1926. London: Adam & Charles Black Ltd. 1926. p. 2816. 
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 28766. p. 7335. 21 October 1913. Retrieved 8 July 2009.
  6. ^ The London Gazette: no. 33245. p. 722. 4 February 1927. Retrieved 8 July 2009.
  7. ^ "Spectator Book Club - Review of "The Last Political Law Lord: Lord Sumner, 1859-1934"". Retrieved 8 July 2009. 

External links[edit]

Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Viscount Sumner
1927 – 1934
Extinct