John Hardres

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John Hardres (2 October 1675 – 14 January 1758) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons of England and then the House of Commons of Great Britain in two periods between 1705 and 1722.

Hardres was the son of Thomas Hardres of Canterbury. He was educated at Wadham College, Oxford.[1]

Hardres was elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Canterbury in 1705 and sat to 1708. He was elected again in 1710 and held the seat until 1722.[2]

In 1711 Hardres required an act of parliament in order to "sell certain Lands, in the County of Kent, and for settling of others to the Uses therein mentioned".[3]

Hardres political views were considered ambiguous. He voted against the government, except on the peerage bill which he supported and received money through Sunderland from the King's bounty in 1721. He also appeared to be a Jacobite, and his name was among those sent to the Pretender in 1721 as a likely supporter in the event of a rising. However he retired in 1722 before he had to declare his views.[4]

Hardres died aged 82 without issue.

References[edit]

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Henry Lee
George Sayer
Member of Parliament for Canterbury
1705-1708
With: Henry Lee
Succeeded by
Edward Watson
Sir Thomas D'Aeth, Bt
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Edward Watson
Sir Thomas D'Aeth, Bt
Member of Parliament for Canterbury
1710-1722
With: Henry Lee 1710-1715
Sir Thomas Hales, Bt 1715-1722
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Hales, Bt
Samuel Milles