John Herkless

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Sir John Herkless
John Herkless.jpg
Courtesy of the University of St Andrews Library[1]
Born (1855-08-09)August 9, 1855
Glasgow, Scotland
Died June 11, 1920(1920-06-11) (aged 64)
Dundee, Scotland
Occupation Writer, biographer, minister, lecturer, Principal of St. Andrews University
Nationality Scottish
Genre Non-fiction, biography, religion, theology

Sir John Herkless (1855–1920) was a Principal and Vice Chancellor of the University of St. Andrews and Principal of United College of St Salvator and St Leonard from 1915 to 1920. He was knighted in 1917 and was the author of several books mainly of an ecclesiastical nature.

He was born in Glasgow on 9 August 1855, the son of William Herkless, an engineer and Janet Robertson. He was educated in the High School of Glasgow before entering Glasgow University. He did not distinguish himself as a student and he left without a degree. However, he studied the arts and attended medical classes. Though he disliked mathematics, he was fond of philosophy.[2] He then studied for the ministry and was duly licensed as a minister. He lectured on English Literature at Queen Margaret College, Glasgow, before becoming an assistant minister. This lasted till 1883 when he was appointed as minister to the parish of Tannadice in Angus. Herkless also held the post of Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of St Andrews.[3] During his career he wrote several books including: The Archbishops of St Andrews which he co-wrote with Robert Hannay and Francis and Dominic and the Mendicant Orders. His chief recreation was golf and he was a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club at St. Andrews. He died in Dundee on 11 June 1920.[4]

His career[edit]

His Publications[edit]

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ This photograph was taken c.1911 and the photographer is unknown - information supplied by the Photographic Archivist, Department of Special Collections, University of St. Andrews Library.
  2. ^ Cf. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v105/n2642/abs/105495a0.html
  3. ^ Cf. http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/drafp/aboutthehall/historyofthehall/
  4. ^ Births and deaths information available at the General Register Office for Scotland, ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh.
  5. ^ Who's Who entry - http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/article/oupww/whowaswho/U197809