John Kimmel (accordionist)

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John J. Kimmel - New York Irish melodeon accordionist 1866-1942.jpg

John J. Kimmel (13 December 1866 - 18 September 1942[1][2]) was a German-American musician known for playing Irish, Scottish, and American music on the 1-row diatonic accordion (or melodeon).[3][4] Though not Irish-American, but rather German-American (born in Brooklyn to German immigrants Margaretha Schmidt and John Kimmel) Kimmel's playing had an enduring effect on the playing of the Irish accordion.[5]

Kimmel's career stretched roughly from 1904-1920,[6] largely in New York City.[citation needed] His earliest recordings, done on Edison Wax Cylinder was around 1906.[7] Kimmel's works often appeared under the name Kimmble,[1] and he was known to bill himself as the Irish Dutchman (cf. Deutsch).[8]

Discography[edit]

Tributes[edit]

  • John J. Kimmel, un héritage fabuleux (2010)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Tim Gracyk; Frank W. Hoffmann (1997). The encyclopedia of popular American recording pioneers, 1895-1925. Tim Gracyk. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Helen O'Shea (2008). The making of Irish traditional music. Cork University Press. ISBN 978-1-85918-436-3. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  3. ^ Dan Michael Worrall (2009). The Anglo-German Concertina: A Social History. Dan Michael Worrall. pp. 248–. ISBN 978-0-9825996-0-0. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  4. ^ Laurie Hart; Greg Sandell (7 October 2010). Danse Ce Soir - Fiddle and Accordion Music of Quebec. Mel Bay Publications. pp. 68–. ISBN 978-1-60974-341-3. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  5. ^ Malcolm Miller (2001). The accordion in all its guises. Harwood Academic Publishers. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  6. ^ Gearóid Ó hAllmhuráin (2003). O'Brien pocket history of Irish traditional music. O'Brien. ISBN 978-0-86278-820-9. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  7. ^ Guy A. Marco; Frank Andrews (April 1993). Encyclopedia of recorded sound in the United States. Garland Pub. ISBN 978-0-8240-4782-5. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  8. ^ Brian Hinton (1 July 2000). Country roads: how country came to Nashville. Sanctuary. ISBN 978-1-86074-293-4. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Music Trades. Music Trades Corporation. 1919. pp. 16–. Retrieved 19 April 2013. 

External links[edit]