John M. Crewdson

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John M. Crewdson (born December 15, 1945) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter. He was a senior correspondent for the Chicago Tribune for 24 years.[1]

Early life[edit]

He attended public schools in Albany, California. In 1970, Crewdson graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with a bachelor's degree in economics. He interned for The New York Times' Washington bureau which was followed by a year of graduate study at Oxford University.[2]

Career[edit]

Crewdson joined The New York Times after his graduate work at Oxford, and covered the Watergate scandal and various scandals related to the CIA and the FBI. He later became a national correspondent based in the newspaper's Houston bureau.

Later, Crewdson joined the Chicago Tribune as a national news editor. In 1989, he wrote a 50,000-word history of the discovery of the AIDS virus. In 1990, Crewdson joined the Chicago Tribune's Washington bureau. In 1994, he wrote about a scandal in breast cancer research that led to strengthening government scrutiny of clinical trials.[3]

In 1996, Crewdson wrote a special report for the Tribune about commercial airplanes' inadequate medical equipment for passenger health emergencies. That report was one of three finalists for the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting.[4]

On November 12, 2008, Crewdson was one of five editorial staff members laid off from the Tribune's Washington, D.C. bureau.[5]

Pulitzer Prize[edit]

Crewdson was the recipient of the 1981 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting "For his coverage of illegal aliens and immigration" while writing for the New York Times.

Books[edit]

John Crewdson has written three books.

  • The Tarnished Door: The New Immigrants and the Transformation of America ISBN 978-0-8129-1042-1 (Times Books, 1983) Looks at the world of illegal aliens residing in the United States and explores topics including the chaos, inadequacy, and corruption of American immigration policy and service.
  • By Silence Betrayed: Sexual Abuse of Children in America (Little Brown & Co: 1988) ISBN 978-0-316-16094-0 Interviews with experts and victims.
  • Science Fictions: A Scientific Mystery, a Massive Cover-Up, and the Dark Legacy of Robert Gallo ISBN 978-0-316-13476-7 (Little Brown & Co. 2002). Describes the competition between scientists—including Robert Gallo of the National Cancer Institute—over credit for the discovery of the HIV virus in a study that offers a revealing look at how scientific and research laboratories really work. Reprint ISBN 978-0-316-09004-9 (Back Bay Books, 2003)

References[edit]

External links[edit]