John M. Geddes

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John M. Geddes
Born John M. Geddes
November 23
Ethnicity Ireland
Occupation Journalist
Notable credit(s) The New York Times
Religion Christian
Family Married

John M. Geddes is an American journalist who served as one of two managing editors of The New York Times. He was appointed to that post in 2003, and left it in 2013.

Geddes served as managing editor for news operations (his co-managing editor was Dean Baquet, later appointed executive editor), with responsibilities including production, budgeting and staffing. He and Jill Abramson (formerly executive editor) were appointed to their positions by then-executive editor Bill Keller to succeed former managing editor Gerald M. Boyd. Boyd stepped down on June 5, 2003, along with the paper's former executive editor, Howell Raines, in the wake of the Jayson Blair scandal.[1]

Background[edit]

Geddes attended college at the University of Rhode Island, graduating in 1974 with a degree in economics, and obtained a master's degree in business journalism in 1976 from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

From 1976 to 1993, Geddes worked in various roles at newspapers. He worked for The Wall Street Journal for 13 years, with assignments including bureau chief in Bonn, deputy managing editor and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal/Europe, and assistant managing editor and national editor for the parent paper in New York. Geddes also served as a reporter for The A.P.-Dow Jones News Service and for Ansonia Evening Sentinel in Connecticut.[2]

Geddes joined the New York Times in 1994 as its business editor and became deputy managing editor in 1997. Just prior to joining the Times, he was chief executive of BIS Strategic Decisions, a market research company acquired by his previous employer, Friday Holdings, an investment partnership.

On January 18, 2013, Geddes announced he was accepting a buyout offer and would be leaving the Times.[3]

Notes[edit]