John M. Riddle

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

John M. Riddle (born 1937) is an Alumni Distinguished Professor emeritus of History at North Carolina State University and a specialist in the history of medicine.

Riddle specializes in pharmacological history particularly of the classical and medieval periods, based on previously under-utilized ancient and medieval sources. His methodology is to draw on the modern understanding of medicine, pharmacy, and chemistry to interpret texts and uncover the rationality of early medicine.[1] He is one of the foremost experts on Dioscorides.[2][3][4] He demonstrated, for instance, that Dioscorides arranged his presentation of drugs by affinities, based on their physiological action on the body. Thus, if a physician did not have a particular drug, he could look to the entry on the drug preceding or following.[5]

He is best known for advancing the view that women in classical antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period deliberately used herbal abortifacients as a means of fertility regulation.[6][7]

Riddle has accepted communications[clarification needed] in the International Congresses[8] of the International Society for the History of Medicine works. He was the former President of the Society for Ancient Medicine and the American Institute for the History of Pharmacy.

Awards[edit]

In 1987, Riddle was awarded the International Urdang Medal for Outstanding Writing in the History of Medicine and Pharmacy. In 1988, he was made a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University.

Published works[edit]

  • Marbode of Rennes' De Lapidibus: Considered as a Medical Treatise with Text, Commentary, and C.W. King's Translation, Together with Text and Translation of Marbode's Minor Works on Stones (Steiner,Sudhoffs Archiv, 1977)
  • Dioscorides on Pharmacy and Medicine (University of Texas press,1986)
  • Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992)
  • Quid pro quo: Studies in the History of Drugs (Aldershot: Variorum, 1992)
  • Eve's Herbs: A History of Contraception and Abortion in the West (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997)
  • A History of the Middle Ages, 300-1500 (Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield, 2008)
  • Goddesses, Elixirs, and Witches: Plants and Sexuality Throughout Human History (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010)
  • Dioscorides on Pharmacy and Medicine (University of Texas press, 2011)

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alain Touwaide, introduction to Herbs and Healers from the Ancient Mediterranean through the Medieval West (Ashgate, 2012), p. 5.
  2. ^ Le Wall, Charles. The Curious Lore of Drugs and Medicines: Four Thousand Years of Pharmacy. (Garden City, New York: Garden City Publishing Co. Inc: 1927) and Riddle, John M.Dioscorides on pharmacy and medicine. (Austin: University of Texas Press,1985)
  3. ^ arker, Linette A. "A Brief History of Materia Medica," in The American Journal of Nursing, Vol.15, No. 9 (June 1915). pp 729-734 and Riddle, John M. Dioscorides on pharmacy and medicine. (Austin: University of Texas Press,1985)
  4. ^ Riddle, John M. (1984). "Dioscorides". In Cranz, F. Edward; Kristeller, Paul Oskar. Catalogus translationum et commentariorum : Mediaeval and Renaissance Latin translations and commentaries : annoted lists and guides. Washington, DC: Catholic Univ. of America Press. ISBN 0-8132-0547-6.
  5. ^ Karen Reeds, review in Isis 78/1 (1987): 85-8.
  6. ^ Riddle, John (1992). Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance. Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-16876-3. 
  7. ^ Van de Walle, Etienne (1997). "Flowers, fruits: two thousand years of menstrual regulation". Journal of Interdisciplinary History 28 (2): 182–203. doi:10.2307/206401. 
  8. ^ 1998 September 6–11, XXXVI Biennial International Congress for the History of Medicine Tunis, Carthage, Tunisia