John Mulligan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

For the 19th-century baseball player, see John Mulligan.

Mulligan
Birth name John Salvator Mulligan
Also known as John Mulligan, Mulligán
Origin Birmingham, England
Genres Post-punk, new wave, synthpop, alternative rock
Occupations Musician, artist
Years active 1978–?
Labels Fàshiön Music, I.R.S.
Associated acts Fashion
TinTin

Jonathan Salvator (John) Mulligan is a Birmingham, England-born new wave musician. He is most prominently known as the bassist and keyboardist of the band Fashion[1] from 1978-1984.

Biography[edit]

Mulligan is Italian, Irish, West Indi and is visually remembered with dreadlocks. Mulligan attended Birmingham Polytechnic School of Art in Margaret Street studying for a fine art degree before forming Fashion.

Mulligan was one of the main founders of Fashion, formed in 1978, by him on bass and syntheziser, Luke Sky on lead vocals and guitar and Dik Davies on drums.

After Luke Sky left and while Fashion was by their second era, Mulligan and Dik Davies joined Duran Duran's original vocalist Stephen Duffy to form TinTin.

Mulligan was also an accomplished visual artist who designed covers for Japan, Kajagoogoo, and Fashion.

John Taylor of Duran Duran was deeply inspired by Mulligan and his early approach to the Birmingham scene. At the end of 2007 beginning of 2008, Luke (Sky) James, the original guitarist and singer of Mulligan's Fashion, launched a Myspace site devoted to the band. On the site James wrote of the original line-up: "2 Dead" (Davis and Cottrell) / "1 living" (James) and "1 missing" (referring to Mulligan.)

A citate of Paul Edmond's in July 2008 - the famous photographer of the early DURAN DURAN's - comes closer to the truth of Mulligan whereabouts: "Mulligan makes small films these days and is based in London".

Equipment[edit]

Synthesizers used in Fashion from 1981 onward

  • Roland Jupiter-8- Primary keyboard
  • Moog Source
  • PPG Wave
  • Oberheim-OB-Xa

Discography of Fashion[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gimarc, George (1 July 2005). Punk diary: the ultimate trainspotter's guide to underground rock, 1970-1982. Hal Leonard Corporation. p. 172. ISBN 978-0-87930-848-3. Retrieved 31 July 2010. 

External links[edit]