John Murray (playwright)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
John Murray
Born (1906-10-12)October 12, 1906
New York City
Died June 17, 1984(1984-06-17) (aged 77)
Connecticut
Occupation Playwright
Known for Room Service
Spouse(s) Joan Loewi
Children 1 son
Parents Morris and Kate Pfeferstein

John Murray (October 12, 1906 – June 17, 1984) was a playwright best known for writing the 1937 play Room Service with Allen Boretz.[1]

Murray was born in New York and attended DeWitt Clinton High School, City College of New York, and Columbia University. His 1937 play, Room Service ran for 500 performances on Broadway and was turned into two films, the first, Room Service, starred the Marx Brothers, the second, Step Lively, starred Frank Sinatra. The play was also adapted for two television productions.[2]

During World War II, Murray served in the United States Army as a captain in the Signal Corp, marrying Joan Loewi in 1941. He return to writing for Broadway after the war, writing songs and sketches for the Ziegfeld Follies and Alive and Kicking. Murray also began writing for the Eddie Cantor radio show and the Phil Baker radio show. Eventually, he turned to writing for television as well.[1]

Plays[edit]

As writer[edit]

  • Room Service (1937)
  • Sing for Your Supper
  • Straw Hat Revue (1939)
  • Earl Carroll Vanities (1940)
  • Sticks and Stones (1940)
  • Ziegfeld Follies (1946)
  • Alive and Kicking (1950)
  • The Monkey Walk (1977)
  • Reitech (1995)[3]

As producer[edit]

  • Room Service (1937)
  • Room Service (1953)
  • Charly's Aunt (1970)[4]

Books[edit]

  • Fifteen Plays for Teen-Agers: A Collection of One-Act Royalty-Free Comedies and Mysteries. T. S. Denison & Co. 1959.
  • Modern Monologues for Young People 1961

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ihler, Marlo M. (2008). "John Murray and Allen Boretz of Room Service". Utah Shakespearean Festival. Retrieved 2009-12-24. [dead link]
  2. ^ "John Murray". imdb.com. Retrieved 2009-12-24. 
  3. ^ "John Murray". doollee.com. Retrieved 2009-12-24. 
  4. ^ "John Murray". Internet Broadway Database. ibdb.com. Retrieved 2009-12-24. 

External links[edit]