John Newte

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John Newte (1656–1716) was a Church of England clergyman, chaplain to Charles II and notably defended the lawfulness of church music.

Background[edit]

John Newte was born at Ottery St Mary in 1656, the son of Richard Newte. He was educated at Blundell's School and Balliol College, Oxford, later obtaining a fellowship at the College. He became Rector of Tidcombe and Pitt Portions, Tiverton, by 1679, and chaplain to Charles II.

Newte championed many charitable causes: giving money for the building of Cove Chapel, founding Charity Schools in Tiverton and elsewhere, and leaving land to Balliol College to found an exhibition for a Blundell’s scholar.

The National Portrait Gallery in London holds a line engraving of Newte by Michael Van der Gucht (after Thomas Forster).

Publications[edit]

  • Mr. Newte's sermon concerning the lawfulness and use of organs in the Christian church Printed by Freeman Collins, 1696
  • The lawfulness and use of organs in the Christian Church. Asserted in a sermon preach'd at Tiverton ... upon the 13th of September, 1696. ... By John Newte, ..., printed by Freeman Collins, and sold by William Rogers; and Humphry Burton bookseller in Tiverton, 1701
  • Roger Chamberline, Francis Plympton, Gent. appellants. John Newte, clerk. Respondent. The respondents case, Case heard before the House of Lords 1707
  • A discourse shewing the duty of honouring the Lord with our substance, Printed by F.C. for W. Rogers [etc.], 1711
  • A discourse shewing the duty of honouring the Lord with our substance, together with the impiety of tithe stealing, printed by F. C. for William Rogers, Richard Wilkin, and Benjamin Tooke, 1711

Sources[edit]