John Njue

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His Eminence
John Njue
Cardinal-Archbishop of Nairobi
Cardinal John Njue.jpg
See Nairobi
Appointed 6 October 2007
Installed 1 November 2007
Predecessor Raphael Ndingi Mwana'a Nzeki
Other posts Cardinal-Priest of Preziosissimo Sangue di Nostro Signore Gesů Cristo
Orders
Ordination 6 January 1973
by Pope Paul VI
Consecration 20 September 1986
by Jozef Tomko
Created Cardinal 24 November 2007
Rank Cardinal-Priest
Personal details
Birth name John Njue
Born (1944-12-31) 31 December 1944 (age 69)
Embu, Kenya
Nationality Kenyan
Denomination Roman Catholic
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Coat of arms {{{coat_of_arms_alt}}}

John Njue (born 31 December 1944)[citation needed] is a Kenyan Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. He is the fourth and current Archbishop of Nairobi, having previously served as Coadjutor Archbishop of Nyeri (2002–2007) and Bishop of Embu (1986–2002). He was elevated to the cardinalate in 2007.

Biography[edit]

Njue was born in Embu, Kenya, to Joseph Nyanga Kibariki and Monica Ngina Nyaga. He was baptized in 1948, and entered the minor seminary in Nkubu in 1962. From 1967 to 1974, he furthered his studies in Rome at the Pontifical Urbaniana University (where he obtained a licentiate in philosophy) and Pontifical Lateran University (licentiate in pastoral theology).

On 6 January 1973, Njue was ordained to the priesthood by Pope Paul VI in St. Peter's Basilica. Returning to Kenya in October 1974, he did pastoral work in Kariakomu in the southern district of Meru. He also taught philosophy at the National Seminary of Bungoma, of which he later served as rector from 1978 to 1982. In 1982, he completed a course in spirituality in the United States. He then served as a parish priest in Chuka and rector of the Philosophical Seminary of Meru.

On 9 June 1986, Njue was appointed Bishop of Embu by Pope John Paul II. He received his episcopal consecration on the following 20 September from Jozef Cardinal Tomko, the co-consecrators being Bishops Silas Silvius Njiru and Raphael Ndingi Mwana'a Nzeki. He served as President of the Kenyan Episcopal Conference from 1997 to 2003, and was named Coadjutor Archbishop of Nyeri on 23 January 2002. Following the murder of Bishop Luigi Locati, he served as Apostolic Administrator of Isolo from 2005–06.

Njue was appointed Archbishop of Nairobi on 6 October 2007, and was installed on the following 1 November. Shortly afterwards, he was created Cardinal-Priest of Preziosissimo Sangue di Nostro Signore Gesù Cristo by Pope Benedict XVI in the consistory of 24 November 2007. On 29 December 2011 he was appointed a member of the Pontifical Council for Social Communications for a five-year renewable term.[1] Cardinal Njue serves as Vice President of the International Catholic Migration Commission.

During a Holy Thursday Mass the Cardinal was celebrating at Nairobi's Holy Family Basilica on March 28, 2013, he appealed for calm and peace during the upcoming Easter season as the Supreme Court of Kenya prepares to announce its verdict in the disputed initial round of the presidential election March 4 between Uhuru Kenyatta and Kenya's Prime Minister Raila Odinga (the decision is expected on Saturday, December 30). Kenyatta and Deputy President-elect William Ruto are facing charges at the International Criminal Court (ICC) at The Hague that they instigated post-electoral violence in Kenya after the 2007 election.[2]

On Saturday, November 30, 2013, Cardinal Njue was named a Member of the Congregation for Catholic Education by Pope Francis.[3]

Views[edit]

Abortion[edit]

Njue has issued a pastoral letter calling abortion a "foreign concept" and blasting the government for attempting to legalise it in Kenya.[4]

Gay rights[edit]

In June 2013, after US president Barack Obama, whose father was Kenyan, said during an official visit in Senegal that African governments should follow the US example in taking action on gay rights,[5] John Njue replied "Let him forget, forget and forget", based on his view that the United States have "ruined their own societies" and that he does not "think God was making a mistake when he created Adam and Eve".[6]

References[edit]

External links[edit]