John P. A. Ioannidis

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John P. A. Ioannidis (born 1965 in New York City) is a Professor of Health Research and Policy at Stanford School of Medicine, the University's Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention and director of its Prevention Research Center, and co-director, along with Steven Goodman, of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS).[1][2] He was chairman at the Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine as well as adjunct professor at Tufts University School of Medicine.[3][4] He is best known for his research and published papers on scientific studies, particularly the 2005 paper "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False".

Biography[edit]

Ioannidis (2005) Why Most Published Research Findings Are False.[5]

Born in New York City in 1965, Ioannidis was raised in Athens, Greece.[6] He was Valedictorian of his class at Athens College, graduating in 1984. He also graduated first in his class at the University of Athens Medical School, then attended Harvard University for his medical residency in internal medicine. He did a fellowship at Tufts University for infectious disease.[7]

Research findings[edit]

Ioannidis's 2005 paper "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False"[5] has been the most downloaded technical paper from the journal PLoS Medicine.[8] A profile of his work in this area appears in the November 2010 issue of The Atlantic.[9] The Atlantic article notes Ioannidis analyzed "49 of the most highly regarded research findings in medicine over the previous 13 years". In the paper Ioannidis compared the 45 studies that claimed to have uncovered effective interventions with data from subsequent studies with larger sample sizes: 7 (16%) of the studies were contradicted, 7 (16%) the effects were smaller than in the initial study and 31 (68%) of the studies remained either unchallenged or the findings could not be replicated.[5]

Statisticians Goodman and Greenland agreed that "many medical research findings are less definitive than readers suspect" but disputed his headline claims as unsupportable by the methods used.[10][11] Ioannidis responded to this critique[12] and other researchers have generally supported the general thrust of his findings.[13][14] Ioannidis' work is focused on improving research design standards.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "John P. A. Ioannidis". Stanford School of Medicine CAP Profiles. Retrieved May 24, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Prevention Research Center". Stanford School of Medicine. Retrieved May 24, 2014. 
  3. ^ "John P. A. Ioannidis". Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine. Retrieved 2008-12-31. 
  4. ^ Ioannidis, John P.A. "Curriculum Vitae". Retrieved 4 November 2010. 
  5. ^ a b c Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2005). "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False". PLoS Medicine 2 (8): e124. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124. PMC 1182327. PMID 16060722.  edit
  6. ^ John Ioannidis Harvard School of Public Health
  7. ^ David H. Freedman (2010). Wrong: Why Experts Keep Failing Us. Little, Brown and Company. ISBN 0-316-02378-7. "Born in 1965 in the United States to parents who were both physicians, he was raised in Athens, where he showed unusual aptitude in mathematics and snagged Greece's top student math prize. ..." 
  8. ^ Robert Lee Hotz (2007-09-14). "Most Science Studies Appear to Be Tainted By Sloppy Analysis". Science Journal WSJ.com (Dow Jones & Company). 
  9. ^ David H. Freedman (November 2010) Lies, Damned Lies, and Medical Science, The Atlantic
  10. ^ Steven Goodman and Sander Greenland (2007). "Assessing the unreliability of the medical literature: A response to "Why most published research findings are false"". Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics. 
  11. ^ Goodman, S.; Greenland, S. (2007). "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: Problems in the Analysis". PLoS Medicine 4 (4): e168. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0040168. PMC 1855693. PMID 17456002.  edit
  12. ^ Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2007). "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: Author's Reply to Goodman and Greenland". PLoS Medicine 4 (6): e215. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0040215. PMC 1896210. PMID 17593900.  edit
  13. ^ New Truths That Only One Can See January 20, 2014 New York Times
  14. ^ "Unreliable research: Trouble at the lab". The Economist. October 19, 2013. 

External links[edit]