John R. Adler

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John R. Adler is an American neurosurgeon. He is the inventor of the CyberKnife radiosurgical instrument.[1][2] In 2007 he was named the Dorothy and Thye King Chan Professor of Neurosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.[3] He was also the school's vice chair for innovation and technology. He is currently an emeritus professor of neurosurgery.[4] In April 2010, Adler was appointed vice president and chief of New Clinical Applications at Varian Medical Systems.[5]

Adler holds 9 United States patents and has authored over 180 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. He is best known as the inventor of the CyberKnife Radiosurgical System, an image-guided radiosurgical robotic instrument[6] that noninvasively ablates tumors and lesions throughout the body. In 1991 Adler founded the company Accuray to develop and manufacture the CyberKnife.[7] He was chief executive officer from 1999 to 2002 and chief medical officer from 1991 until 2007. He also was a member of the Accuray board of directors from 1991 until July 2009. In 2002, Adler founded the CyberKnife Society of which he was president from 2002 until 2009.[8]

In 2009, Adler founded Curēus.com (originally known as peerEmed.com), a web-based peer-reviewed medical journal that combines attributes of traditional expert review and social networks with the objective of fairly compensating reviewers and authors.[9]

Adler was born in Yonkers, New York in 1954. He graduated at Harvard College in 1976 and at Harvard Medical School in 1980. From 1980 to 1987 he did a neurosurgical residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital and a radiosurgery fellowship at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, where he worked with Lars Leksell.

He is the father of Trip Adler, co-founder and CEO of Scribd.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Adler, John R., Jr.; et al. (1997). "The Cyberknife: a frameless robotic system for radiosurgery". Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery 69: 124–128. doi:10.1159/000099863. 
  2. ^ "Stanford CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery". Stanford Hospital & Clinics. Retrieved 11 July 2012. 
  3. ^ "Radiosurgeon named to new endowed professorship". Stanford Report (Stanford University). August 27, 2007. Retrieved 11 July 2012. 
  4. ^ "Academic profile: John R. Adler". Stanford University School of Medicine. Retrieved 11 July 2012. 
  5. ^ "John R. Adler, M.D.". Varian Medical Systems. Retrieved 11 July 2012. 
  6. ^ Adler, John R., Jr.; et al. (June 1999). "Image-guided Robotic Radiosurgery". Neurosurgery 44 (6): 1299–1306. doi:10.1227/00006123-199906000-00079. 
  7. ^ Adler, John (9/16/09). "Accuray, Inc.: A Neurosurgical Business Case Study". Cureus 1 (9): 11 Extra |pages= or |at= (help). doi:10.7759/cureus.1. Retrieved 7/3/14. 
  8. ^ "The Cyberknife Society". Accuray. Retrieved 11 July 2012. 
  9. ^ "About Cureus". Cureus.com. Retrieved 11 July 2012. 

External links[edit]