John Rickingale

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John Rickingale
D.D.
Bishop of Chichester
Church Catholic
See Diocese of Chichester
In office 1426–1429
Predecessor Thomas Polton
Successor Thomas Brunce
Personal details
Died about 6 July 1429
Buried Chichester Cathedral[1]

John Rickingale D.D. also known as John de Rickingale (died 1429) was a medieval Bishop of Chichester, Master of Gonville Hall, Cambridge, Chancellor of the University of Cambridge[2][3] and Chancellor of York Minster.[4]

Rickingale was the last rector of Hemingbrough rectory before Prior John Wessington converted it into a collegiate church.[5] This happened when Rickingale was nominated as bishop of Chichester on 27 February 1426. The nomination was through the interest of John of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Bedford, to whom he was confessor.[1] He was consecrated in Mortlake parish church on 30[2] or 3 June 1426.[4] He was an early humanist.[2]

Death[edit]

He died about 6 July 1429[6] and is buried in the north aisle of Chichester Cathedral. He left instructions that a marble effigy of himself should be left as a monument over his tomb.[1] The following verses are engraved on his tomb:

Tu qualis cris ? quid mundi quæris honores.
See what thou soon shall be ! Why dost thou seek
Wordly honours ? Think on thy sins, and weep.
Behold in me, what thou shalt shortly be,
Death at the doors,cries - come along with me.

Tomb of John Rickingale[4]

The executors of his will were Peter Schelton, Master & treasurer of the church in Chichester, Edward Hunt, canon of Chichester, John Eppe, parson of Anderby and his nephew John Mannyng.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c William Richard Wood Stephens, 1876. Memorials of the South Saxon See and Cathedral Church of Chichester, page 137
  2. ^ a b c Jacob, E.F., 1956. St. Richard of Chichester, The Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 7(2)
  3. ^ CHANCELLORS OF CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY 1246-1950, genuki.org.uk
  4. ^ a b c Hay, A., The History of Chichester: Interpersed with Various Notes and Observations .., page 456
  5. ^ Dobson, R.B., 2005. Durham Priory 1400-1450, Cambridge University Press, page 157
  6. ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 239
  7. ^ Henry VI, 1430: CP40no677, By Rosemary Simons, aalt.law.uh.edu
Academic offices
Preceded by
Stephen le Scrope
Chancellor of the University of Cambridge
1415–1421
Succeeded by
Thomas Cobham
Preceded by
William Somersham
Master of Gonville Hall
1416–1426
Succeeded by
Thomas Attwood
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
unknown
Rector of Hemingbrough
unknown–1426
Succeeded by
unknown
Preceded by
Thomas Polton
Bishop of Chichester
1426–1429
Succeeded by
Thomas Brunce