John Robert Evans

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other people named John Evans, see John Evans (disambiguation).
John Evans
9th President of the University of Toronto
In office
1972–1978
Preceded by Claude Bissell
Succeeded by James Milton Ham
Personal details
Born John Robert Evans
(1929-10-01)October 1, 1929
Toronto, Ontario
Died February 13, 2015(2015-02-13) (aged 85)
Toronto, Ontario
Spouse(s) Gay Glassco
Alma mater University of Toronto
University of Oxford

John Robert Evans, CC OOnt (October 1, 1929 – February 13, 2015) was a Canadian cardiologist, academic, businessperson, and civic leader.

He was the founding dean of the McMaster University Medical School and then vice-president of Health Services at McMaster University from 1965 to 1972. From 1972 to 1978 he was President of the University of Toronto. From 1979 to 1983, he served as founding Director of the Population, Health and Nutrition Department of the World Bank in Washington, D.C.

Evans was a key player in the sale of the Canadian Connaught Laboratories to the French Sanofi-Aventis.

He was elected as the ninth Chairman of the Rockefeller Foundation, a position that he held from 1987 to 1995. Dr. Evans was the first Canadian to hold the position. [1]

He was chairman of Allelix Biopharmaceuticals Inc., Torstar Corporation, Alcan Aluminum Ltd. (1995–2002), the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation. He was the chairman of and helped create the MaRS Discovery District in Toronto. He died at the age of 85 from Parkinson's disease in 2015.[2]

Early Life and Education[edit]

Evans was born in Toronto, and was the youngest of seven children. His parents were Mary and William Watson Evans. Evans was orphaned at the age of nine and was subsequently raised by his older siblings. [3] He went to the University of Toronto Schools for high school, and after graduating from UTS, studied medicine at the University of Toronto (U of T). He was a varsity football player at U of T and would later become a member of U of T's Sports Hall of Fame.[4] He received his medical degree from the University of Toronto in 1952 and was a Rhodes Scholar at University College, Oxford. He received his Doctoral degree specializing in internal medicine and cardiology at Oxford University in 1955.

Academic career[edit]

Evans was a research fellow at Harvard Medical School from 1960-61, he then returned to Toronto as an associate professor at U of T's faculty of medicine. He also worked as a cardiologist at Toronto General Hospital during this period, apparently the only time that he practised medicine.[5]

At the relatively young age of 35, Evans was selected as the founding Dean of McMaster University's new Medical School.

Politics[edit]

In a 1978 federal by-election, Evans ran for a seat in the House of Commons as a Liberal in the Toronto riding of Rosedale, but was defeated by former Toronto Mayor David Crombie.[6]

Honours and awards[edit]

Honorary degrees[edit]

Dr. Evans received 15 Honorary Doctorates, including:


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chairman and Trustees Elected at Rockefeller". New York Times. 20 June 1987. Archived from the original on 16 March 2015. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 
  2. ^ http://www.thespec.com/news-story/5341240-john-evans-co-founded-mac-school-of-medicine/
  3. ^ McMahon, Tamsin (13 February 2015). "MaRS Discovery District founder Dr. John Evans dies at 85". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on 14 February 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  4. ^ Oved, Marco Chown (13 February 2015). "John Evans, founder of MaRS, dead at 85". The Toronto Star. Archived from the original on 14 February 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  5. ^ Stoffman, Judy (6 March 2015). "A humble man of many talents, John Evans reinvented medical education". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on 8 March 2015. Retrieved 5 April 2015. 
  6. ^ "History of Federal Ridings since 1867". Parliament of Canada. Retrieved 16 March 2015. 
  7. ^ "Laureates - Dr. John R. Evans". Friends of Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Retrieved 17 March 2015. 
  8. ^ "John R. Evans". Gairdner Foundation. Retrieved 17 March 2015. 
  9. ^ "In Memoriam: Dr John Evans (1953), Honorary Fellow". University College, Oxford. Archived from the original on 23 February 2015. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  10. ^ "U of T's Evans, retired Forces chief head list of Order of Canada names". Ottawa: The Globe and Mail. Jan 14, 1978. p. 12. 
  11. ^ "McMaster University Honorary Degree Recipients (Chronological)" (PDF). p. 14. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 December 2014. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 
  12. ^ "Honorary Degree Recipients". York University. Archived from the original on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 
  13. ^ "Honorary Graduates" (PDF). Memorial University of Newfoundland. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 March 2015. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  14. ^ "Honorary Degrees" (PDF). Queen's University. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 March 2015. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 
  15. ^ "Honorary Degree Recipients". Wilfred Laurier University. Archived from the original on 19 March 2015. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  16. ^ "Yale Honorary Degree Recipients". Yale University. Archived from the original on 18 October 2014. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  17. ^ "JHU Honorary Degrees Awarded". Johns Hopkins University. Archived from the original on 31 December 2014. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  18. ^ "Honorary Degree Recipients 1850 - 2014" (PDF). University of Toronto. p. 20. Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 February 2015. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  19. ^ "Honorary Degrees". Maastricht University. Archived from the original on 19 March 2015. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  20. ^ "Honorary Degree Recipients by Last Name" (PDF). University of Calgary. Archived from the original (PDF) on 23 February 2015. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 
  21. ^ "Honorary degree recipients for President’s Install". University of Alberta. Archived from the original on 14 Sep 2014. Retrieved 19 March 2015. 
  22. ^ Harding, Frances. "Convocation 2009". Archived from the original on 27 August 2011. Retrieved 18 March 2015. 

External Links[edit]


Academic offices
Preceded by
None
Dean and vice-president
of the McMaster University Medical School,
McMaster University

1965-1972
Succeeded by
Fraser Mustard