John S. Lewis

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John S. Lewis
Born John Simpson Lewis Jr.
(1941-06-27) June 27, 1941 (age 73)
Trenton, NJ
Residence Tucson, Arizona
Nationality American
Fields chemistry of the Solar System, space resources, impact hazards
Alma mater Princeton University
Dartmouth College
University of California, San Diego
Thesis  (1968)
Doctoral advisor Harold Urey
Other academic advisors George B. Field, Alexander Kaczmarczyk, Robert Pease
Doctoral students Ronald G Prinn, Carl Pilcher, Stuart J Weidenschilling, Stephen Barshay, Mark Sonter
Other notable students David Grinspoon
Thomas David Jones
Stewart Nozette
Notable awards James B Macelwayne Award of the American Geophysical Union, NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal
Spouse Peg

John S. Lewis (born June 27, 1941) is a Professor Emeritus of planetary science at the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. His interests in the chemistry and formation of the solar system and the economic development of space have made him a leading proponent of turning potentially hazardous near-Earth objects into attractive space resources.

Career[edit]

The son of John Simpson Lewis, a YMCA professional, and Elsie Dinsmore Vandenbergh, a school teacher. Lewis received his B.S. in chemistry from Princeton University in 1962 as a National Merit Scholar. He then continued his education at Dartmouth College receiving his M.A. in inorganic chemistry in 1964. He received his Ph.D in geochemistry and cosmochemistry from University of California, San Diego in 1968, where he studied under Harold Urey. Prior to joining the University of Arizona, Lewis taught space sciences and cosmochemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

An expert on the composition and chemistry of asteroids and comets, Lewis has written such popular science books as Rain of Iron and Ice and Mining the Sky: Untold Riches from the Asteroids, Comets, and Planets. Lewis is a frequent commentator on the Chinese network CCTV when China broadcasts its major missions live.

He was a member of the Board of Directors of American Rocket Company and is currently Chief Scientist at Deep Space Industries.

Raised a Presbyterian, Dr Lewis became a Mormon,[1] in 1980.

In February 2013, Dr Lewis will assume the role of Chief Scientist[disambiguation needed] for the firm Deep Space Industries. Dr. Lewis will focus on strategic planning, mission development and processing concepts for Deep Space.[2][3][4]

Publications[edit]

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